GUIDE TO COMPLETING THE LANDMARK NOMINATION FORM

GUIDE TO COMPLETING THE LANDMARK NOMINATION FORM
The following step-by-step directions have been drafted for use with the “Oak Park
Landmark Nomination Form.” This “Guide to Completing the Oak Park landmark
Nomination Form” is based on the more extensive National Register Bulletin 16A “How to
Complete the National Register Registration Form.” If you wish to read the many helpful
examples provided in Bulletin 16A as a means to completing your “Oak Park Landmark
Nomination Form, “ a copy of this National Register publication is available for your use by
contacting the Community Planning and Development Department, Village Hall, 123
Madison Street, Oak Park, Illinois 60302. (708) 358-5417.
1.
NAME OF PROPERTY
Historic Name
Enter the established name that best reflects the property’s historic importance or was
commonly used for the property during its period of significance. Historic properties may be
named for persons, events, characteristics, functions, or historic associations.
The historic name of a property, site or object is required in addition to the Common Name,
because, due to historical associations, the historic name often continues to be meaningful
over many years, regardless of changes in ownership or use. In addition, the historic name
often relates to the reasons the property is eligible for landmark designation.
If a property is significant for more than one person or event, place the oldest name or event
first, with the later names or events in chronological order following it.
Differentiate properties with similar names or associations by numbering them or adding
additional pertinent information, such as location, to the name. Examples would be:
Babson I
Babson II
U.S. Post Office – Oak Park North Branch
If a property or site does not have a historic name, enter N/A (not applicable).
Common Name(s)
Enter any other names by which the property has been commonly known. The Common
Name may reflect a property’s history, current ownership or popular use.
2.
LOCATION
Provide the name and number of the street where the property is located. If the object
being nominated is located in a public space such as a park, indicate the common name of
the space, and the vicinity in which the object is located within that space.
3.
CLASSIFICATION
Ownership of Property
Check as many boxes as apply, to indicate ownership of the property, site or object.
Private: Property owned by an individual, group of people, or organized body such as a
church or corporation, but not a local, state or federal government body.
Public-Local: Property owned in whole or part by the Village of Oak Park, Park District of Oak
Park or School Districts 97 or 200, etc.
Public-State: Property owned in whole or part by the State government.
Public-Federal: Property owned in whole or part by the U.S. Government.
Category of Property
Check only one to indicate the type of property being nominated.
Building: A “Building,” such as a house, church, commercial building or similar construction
is created principally to shelter any form of human activity. Examples of “Buildings” include:
Houses, coach houses, sheds, garages, courthouses, social halls, hospitals,
commercial buildings, factories, hotels, theaters, schools, stores and churches.
Site: A “Site” is the location of a significant event, a prehistoric or historic occupation or
activity, or a building or structure, whether standing, ruined, or vanished, where the location
itself possesses historic cultural or archeological value regardless of the value of any
existing structure. Examples of “Sites” include:
Habitation sites, funerary sites, ceremonial sites, gardens, grounds, ruins of
historic buildings, trails, areas of land, cemeteries, designed landscapes, and
natural features, such as springs and rock formations, and land areas having
cultural significance.
Structure: The term “Structure” is used to distinguish from buildings those functional
constructions made usually for purposes other than creating human shelter. Examples of
“Structures” include:
Bridges, power plants, roadways, mounds or earthworks, railroad grades, systems
of roadways and paths, railroad locomotives and cars, bandstands and gazebos.
Object: The term “Object” is used to distinguish from buildings and structures those
constructions that are primarily artistic in nature or are relatively small in scale and simply
constructed. Although it may be, by nature or design, movable, an object is associated with
a specific setting or environment. Examples of “Objects” include:
Sculpture, monuments, boundary markers, statuary and fountains.
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Type of Designation – Check all that apply.
The exterior of any building, site, structure or object in the Village of Oak Park may be
nominated for listing as an Oak Park landmark. Oak Park landmark designation, based on
the interior of a structure, may be undertaken only if the interior is open to the public.
Number of Resources
Each building on the property counts as one building or structure. Secondary buildings such
as coach houses, barns or garages that fall within the period of significance of the property
should be included as contributing resources. A Landmark nomination may include more
than one building on a property.
4.
FUNCTION OR USE
Knowing both a structure’s historic and current functions is most significant when a building
has changed uses throughout history. For instance, a barn which was later converted to a
garage, a store which was converted to a single family home, or even a single family home
which has been converted into a rooming house (multiple family dwelling).
Historic Function(s)
From the list provided in Appendix 1, Data Categories for Functions and Uses, select the
category (ies) and subcategory (ies) which most accurately describe the property’s principal
historic function. Enter the most specific category. For properties with many functions, list
only the principal or predominant ones, placing the most important first. Examples:
Domestic: single dwelling
Commerce/Trade; department store
Social meeting hall
Government: post office
The “Historic Function” refers to the way in which the property being nominated operated
during the property’s period of significance (see section 6b, “Period of Significance”).
Enter functions related to the property itself, and not to the occupation of persons
historically or currently associated with the structure, or with events tied to the structure.
Enter only functions that can be verified by research, testing or examination of physical
evidence.
Current Function(s)
From the same list, Data Categories for Functions and Uses, select the category (ies) and
subcategory (ies) which most accurately describe the property’s principal current function.
The “Current Function” refers to the way in which the property being nominated currently
operates. For properties undergoing rehabilitation, restoration, or adaptive reuse, enter
“Work in Progress,” in addition to any functions that are current or anticipated upon
completion of the work.
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5.
DESCRIPTION
Architectural Classification
In the space provided, enter the category(ies) and one or more subcategory(ies) which best
describe the property’s Architectural Style(s) or stylistic influences of the structure being
nominated. The categories and subcategories may be selected from the list provided in
Appendix 2, Data Categories for Architectural Classification.
The categories appearing in capital letters in the far left column relate to general stylistic
periods of American architecture. The subcategories, appearing in the indented left column,
relate to the specific styles or stylistic influences that occurred in each period. The right
column lists other commonly used terms. From the two left columns, select the categories
or subcategories that most closely relate to the period and stylistic character of the property.
For properties not described by any of the listed terms, enter “other” with the descriptive
term most commonly used to classify the property type, period, method of construction, or
other characteristics. For buildings and structures not described by the listed terms or by
“other’ and a common term, enter “no style.”
Materials
Enter one or more terms from the list provided below, Data Categories for Materials, to
describe the principal exterior materials of the property. Enter both historic and modern
materials, respectively, as in the example:
Walls: wood clapboard / aluminum siding
Enter only those materials which are visible on the exterior of the building, structure or
object. Do not enter materials of interior, structural or concealed architectural features even
if they are significant.
Use a continuation sheet, if necessary, making sure to list additional entries under major
headings such as “foundation,” walls,” “roof,” or “other.”
Foundation: Refer to the exposed portion of the foundation wall which is visible above
ground, at the base of the structure.
Walls: This category should include material indications for all exterior wall surfaces, as
well as material indications for later additions and porches.
Windows: Enter descriptions for both permanent windows and storm windows. For
example:
Windows: Wood w/ aluminum storms
Roof: Describe the roofing material.
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Significant Decorative Elements: Enter material indications for major decorative
elements which contribute significantly to the design of the structure. For example:
Significant Decorative elements: Turned wood newel posts and balusters.
Other: Enter the principal materials for contributing secondary parts of the exterior,
such as chimneys, porches, lintels, cornices, and decorative elements which were not
included in the categories above.
Data Categories for Materials:
WOOD – Clapboard, Shingle, Plywood, Particle board, Board & Batten, etc.
BRICK
STONE – Granite, Sandstone, Brownstone, Limestone, Marble, Slate, etc.
METAL – Iron, Copper, Bronze, Tin, Aluminum, Steel, Lead, Brass, Cast Iron, Wrought
Iron, Zinc, Galvanized sheet metal, Stainless steel, Tern metal, Lead coated copper,
Tern coated stainless steel. Sheet iron, etc.
STUCCO
TERRA COTTA, CLAY TILE
ASPHALT
CEMENT ASBESTOS
CONCRETE
CERAMIC TILE, QUARRY TILE
GLASS
FABRIC – Cloth, Canvas, Vinyl, etc.
SYNTHETICS – Fiberglass, Rubber, Plastic, Compo, Aluminum, Vinyl, etc.
OTHER
Narrative Description
Describe the historic and current condition of the property on one or more continuation
sheets. The narrative should document the evolution of the property, describing major
changes since its construction or period of significance.
Guidelines for Describing Properties
Begin with a summary paragraph that briefly describes the general characteristics of the
property, such as its location and setting, type, style, method of construction, size and
significant features. Describe the current condition of the property and indicate whether the
property has historic integrity in terms of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship,
feeling and association. (Use subsequent paragraphs to fill in the details following the
outline established in the summary paragraph.)
Describe the building in a logical sequence – the exterior from the group up, façade by
façade. The amount of detail needed in the description depends on the size and complexity
of the property and the extent to which alterations, additions and deterioration have
affected the property’s integrity. For example, the more extensively a building has been
altered, the more thorough the description of additions, replacement materials, and other
alterations should be.
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Clearly delineate between original and existing appearance. First describe the current
appearance of a particular feature. Then describe its original appearance and any changes,
noting when the changes occurred.
Photographs and sketch maps, other than those required for nomination submission, may
be used to supplement the narrative.
6.
STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE
In order to designate an Oak Park landmark, a property must be proven to possess historic
significance and integrity. The significance of a building, site, structure or object is based on
compliance with one or more of the Historic Preservation Ordinance Criteria, outlined in
section 6a below. Historic integrity is the authenticity of a property’s historic identity,
evidenced by the survival of physical characteristics that existed during the property’s period
of significance.
Historic integrity is the composite of seven qualities:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Location
Design
Setting
Materials
Workmanship
Feeling
Association
Historic integrity enables a property to illustrate significant aspects of its past. Not only
must a property resemble its historic appearance, but it must also retain physical materials,
design features, and aspects of construction dating from its period of significance. All seven
qualities do not need to be present for eligibility as long as the overall sense of past time
and place is evident.
Completion of sections 6a. through 6f, will firmly establish the basis by which the nominated
structure is considered historically or architecturally significant.
Areas of Significance:
The following criteria are those which are outlined in the Oak Park Historic Preservation
Ordinance and qualify the property for Oak Park Landmark designation. Properties are often
significant for more than one criterion. Use only those qualifying criteria that are supported
by the narrative statement of significance.
Historical And/Or Cultural Importance
• Significance as an example of the architectural, cultural, economic, historic or social
development or heritage of the Village of Oak Park, the State, or the United States;
• Location as a site of an historic event, with a significant effect on the Village of Oak
Park, the State, or the United States;
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•
Identification with a person or persons who significantly contributed to the
architectural, cultural, economic, historic or social heritage, or other aspect, of the
Village of Oak Park, the State, or the United States;
Architectural And/Or Engineering Importance
• Existence on the National Register of Historic Places;
• Embodiment of those distinguishing characteristics of significant architectural type,
or style, or engineering specimen;
• Identification as the work of a builder, designer, architect, craftsperson, engineer or
landscape architect whose individual work is significant in the development of the
Village of Oak Park, the State, or the United States;
• Contains design elements, detail, materials or craftsmanship that make the property
or building structurally or architecturally innovative, rare or unique;
• Representation of an architectural, cultural, economic, historic or social theme, style
or period, expressed in distinctive areas, districts, places, buildings or structures that
may or may not be contiguous.
Period of Significance
Enter the dates for one or more periods of time when the property attained the significance
qualifying it as a Landmark. Some periods of significance are as brief as a single year.
Others span many years and consist of beginning and closing dates. Combine overlapping
periods and enter them as one longer period of significance.
Period of significance is the length of time when a property was associated with important
events, activities or persons, or attained the characteristics which qualify it as a Landmark.
Period of significance usually begins with the date when significant activities or events
began giving the property its historic significance. This is often a date of construction.
Base the significance on specific events directly related to the significance of the property.
For example, the date of construction of a building significant for its design or the length of
time a store operated and contributed to local commercial development.
The property must possess historic integrity for all periods of significance entered.
Continued use or activity does not necessarily justify continuing the period of significance.
The period of significance is based upon the time when the property made the contributions
or achieved the character on which significance is based.
Fifty (50) years ago is used as the closing date for periods of significance.
List the period of significance most important to the property first. If there is more than one
period of significance, enter each period of significance on a different line, placing them in
descending order of importance. Use a continuation sheet if more space is needed.
Guidelines for Selecting Periods of Significance
• For the site of an important event, such as a pivotal five-month labor strike, the
period of significance is the time when the event occurred.
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•
•
•
•
For properties associated with historic trends, such as commercial development, the
period of significance is the span of time when the property actively contributed to
the trend.
For properties significant for their association with important persons, the period of
significance is usually the length of time the property was associated with the
important person.
For architecturally significant properties, the period of significance is the design and
construction period and / or the dates of any significant alterations and additions.
For period of significance for an archeological site is the estimated time when it was
occupied or used for reasons related to its importance, for example 3000-2500 B.C.
Architect and/or Builder
Enter the full name of the person(s) responsible for the design or construction of the
property. This includes architects, artists, builders, craftsmen, designers, engineers, and
landscape architects. For more than one architect/builder, place the name of the one most
important to the property first. Use a continuation sheet, if additional space is needed.
Guidelines for Entering Name of Architect/Builder
Enter the names of architectural and engineering firms, only if the names of the specific
persons responsible for the design are unknown.
If the property’s design is derived from the stock plans of a company, developer or
government agency and is credited to a specific individual, enter the name of the company
or agency.
Enter the name of the property owners or contractors only if they were actually responsible
for the property’s design or construction.
If the architect or builder is not known, enter “unknown.”
Narrative Statement of Significance
Explain how the property meets Oak Park Landmark criteria in a narrative statement of
significance. You may use one or more continuation sheets. Drawing on facts about the
history of the property and historic trends – local, state or national – that the property
reflects, make the case for the property’s historic significance and integrity.
Guidelines for Writing a Statement of Significance
1.
A summary paragraph which provides the Statement of Significance. In the summary
paragraph, simply and clearly outline the reasons why the property meets the Oak
Park Landmark criteria. Add to the information marked on the form for Section 6, by
providing brief facts that explain how the property meets the criteria, and the ways it
was important to the history of its locality, State, or the nation during the period of
significance. Specifically associate the property with historic events, activities,
persons, physical features, artistic qualities, architectural styles, and archeological
evidence which contribute to its significance. Mention the important themes or
historic contexts to which the property relates/contributes.
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The statement of significance should be concise, factual, well-organized, and in
paragraph form. Include only information pertinent to the property and its eligibility.
Role of any important persons entered previously on the form.
2.
Several supporting paragraphs that briefly discuss:
2a.
The history of the property:
Discuss the chronology and historic development of the property. Highlight and focus
on the events, associations, characteristic, and other facts that relate the property to
its historic contexts and are the basis for its meeting the Oak Park Landmark criteria.
Make clear the connection between each area of significance, its corresponding
criterion, and period of significance.
The following guidelines, in the form of questions, address the key points that should
be covered in the supporting paragraphs:
All Properties
a) What events took place on the significant dates on the form, and in what ways
are they important to the property?
b) In what ways does the property physically reflect its period of significance, and in
what ways does it reflect changes after the period of significance?
c) What is the period of significance based on? Be specific and refer to existing
resources or features within the property or important events in the property’s
history.
Buildings, Structures and Objects
d) What are the historically significant events or patterns of activity (if any)
associated with the property? Does the existing building reflect in a tangible way
the important historical associations? How have alterations or additions
contributed to or detracted from the resource’s ability to convey the feeling and
association of the significant historic period?
e) How long and when was the individual (if any) associated with the property and
during what period in his or her life? What were the individual’s significant
contributions during the period of association? Are there other resources in the
vicinity also having strong associations with the individual? If so, compare their
significance and associations to that of the property being nominated.
f) What are the architectural, landscape, aesthetic or other physical qualities and
whay are they significant? Does the property retain enough of its significant
design to convey these qualities? If not, how have additions or alterations
contributed to or detracted from the significance of the resource?
g) Does the property have possible archeological significance and to what extent
has this significance been considered?
h) Does the property possess attributes that could be studied to extract important
information? For example, does it contain tools, equipment, furniture, refuse, or
other materials that could provide information about the social organization of its
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occupants, their relations with other persons and groups, or their daily lives? Has
the resource been rebuilt or added to in ways that reveal changing concepts of
style or beauty?
i) If the property is no longer at its original location, why did the move occur? How
does the new location affect the historical and architectural integrity of the
property?
Historic Sites
j) How does the property relate to the significant event, occupation, or activity that
took place there?
k) How have alterations such as the destruction of original buildings, changes in
land use, and changes in foliage or topography affected the integrity of the site
and its ability to convey its significant associations?
l) In what ways does the event that occurred here reflect the broad patterns of
local, state or national history and why is it significant?
Be specific, in all references to history. Give dates and proper names of owners,
architects or builders, other people, and places. Address the reader who has little or
no knowledge of the property or the area where it is located.
Include descriptive and historical information about the area where the property is
located: orient the reader to the property’s surroundings and the kind of community
or place where it functioned in the past. Again, focus on facts that help explain the
property’s role and illustrate its importance.
Consult with the Village to determine what and how much information is needed to
support the property’s significance and integrity.
2b.
The historic contexts, themes, trends, and patterns of development relating to
the property.
Relate the property to important themes in the history of Oak Park, the State of
Illinois or the nation: Include information about the history of the community or
larger geographical area that explains the ways the property is unique or
representative of its theme, place, and time.
Incorporate the following information to the extent that it relates to the significance
of the property.
Specific events; activities and uses; influence of technology; aspects of
development; common architectural styles or types; construction
materials and methods; role of important persons or organizations;
cultural affiliations; political organization; social or cultural traditions;
trends in local or regional development; patterns of physical
development; economic forces; presence and condition of similar
properties.
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The discussion of historic context should do several things:
Explain the role of the property in relationship to broad historic trends,
drawing on specific facts about the property and its community.
Briefly describe the history of the community where the property is located as
it directly relates to the property. Highlight any notable events and patterns of
development that affected the property’s history, significance, and integrity.
Explain the importance of the property in each area of significance by showing
how the property is unique, outstanding, or strongly representative of an
important historic context when compared with other properties of the same
or similar period, characteristics, or associations.
Incorporate the facts needed to make the case for significance and integrity.
Consult with the Village for help in determining how much and what kinds of
information is needed. The site of a pivotal historic event or a textbook example
of a prominent architectural style usually requires less documentation than a
property associated with a common-place local event or exhibiting a vernacular
building form about which little is written.
Additional helpful information on how to compile a historic context is outlined in the
Guidelines for Developing Historic Context, reproduced in Appendix 3.
7.
MAJOR BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES
In the area provided, and on continuation sheets as necessary, cite the books, articles, and
other sources used in preparing this form.
Enter the primary and secondary sources used in documenting and evaluating the property.
These include books, journal or magazine articles, interviews, oral history tapes, planning
documents, historic resources studies or survey reports, census data, newspaper articles,
deeds, wills, correspondence, business records, diaries, and other sources. Do not include
general reference works unless they provide specific information about the property or have
assisted in evaluating the property’s significance.
8.
REPRESENTATION IN EXISTING SURVEYS
Mark an X on as many lines as apply for the property being nominated, indicating that the
property has been included in one of the following surveys:
•
•
Hasbrouck/Sprague Survey of Historic Architecture in Oak Park: Available at the Oak
Park Public Library, the Historical Society of Oak Park & River Forest, and Village Hall
Illinois Historic/Architectural Resources Survey: Available through the Illinois
Historic Preservation Agency in Springfield, IL and at Village Hall
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•
•
•
9.
Oak Park Potential Landmark Inventory: Available through the Oak Park Historic
Preservation Commission at Village Hall
National Register of Historic Places/National Historic Landmark: Indicate if the
structure being nominated has already been accepted into the National Register of
Historic Places. Indicate whether the structure was listed individually or as part of an
existing Historic District. Indicate also the name of the district in which the structure
is included. The National Register Historic District nomination forms are available in
the Oak Park Public Library or at Village Hall.
Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) / Historic American Engineering Record
(HAER): Indicate if the property under consideration has been physically documented
through measured drawings through the national HABS/HAER program. Information
on these documents can be obtained through the Library of Congress in Washington,
D.C., or, in some cases, through the Burnham/Ryerson Library of the Art Institute of
Chicago.
GEOGRAPHICAL DATA
Legal Description
In the space provided, enter either a legal description (available on the plat of survey,
obtained when the title of property is transferred) or the PIN (Permanent R.E. Index Number)
available from the Township Assessor’s Office and the tax bill.
Lot Dimensions
Available on Plat of Survey typically obtained when title to property is transferred. Also, a
copy of the applicable Sidwell plat map will be provided by the Village.
10.
FORM PREPARED BY
This section identifies the person who prepared the form and his or her affiliation. This
person is responsible for the information contained in the form. The Oak Park Historic
Preservation Commission may contact this person if a question arises about the form or if
additional information is needed.
Property Owner or Tax Payer:
Please submit on a separate blank page the name(s) and address (es) of all fee-simple
property owner(s) for individual buildings, structures, sites, and objects. This information is
used to notify owners of the intended nomination of their property to the commission and,
afterwards, its listing. Tax payer’s name is available through the Township Assessor’s Office,
as described in Section 9 above. Legal Description, above.
The following sections 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 will be completed by the Village.
11.
OFFICIAL ACTION:
Date(s) Owner(s) notified:
Date of Public Hearings:
Date of Designation:
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APPENDICES
The following charts have been reproduced here from the National Register Bulletin No.
16A, “How to Complete the National Register Registration Form, “ U.S. Department of the
Interior, National Park Service, Interagency Resources Division, 1991:
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Appendix 1: DATA CATEGORIES FOR FUNCTIONS AND USES
Appendix 2: DATA CATEGORIES FOR ARCHITECTURAL CLASSIFICATION
Appendix 3: GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPING HISTORIC CONTEXT
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Appendix 1: DATA CATEGORIES FOR FUNCTIONS AND USES
CATEGORY
SUBCATEGORY
EXAMPLES
DOMESTIC
Single dwelling
Row houses, mansion, residence, rock shelter,
homestead, cave
Multiple dwelling
Duplex, apartment building, pueblo, rock shelter,
cave
Dairy, smokehouse, storage pit, storage shed,
kitchen, garage, other dependents
Inn, hotel, motel, way station
Secondary structure
Hotel
Institutional housing
COMMERCE / TRADE
Camp
Military quarters, staff housing, poor house,
orphanage
Hunting campsite, fishing camp, summer camp,
forestry camp, seasonal residence, temporary
habitation site, tipping rings
Village site
Pueblo group
Business
Office building
Professional
Architect’s studio, engineering office, law office
Organizational
Trade union, labor union, professional association
Financial institution
Savings and loan associations, bank, stock exchange
Specialty store
Restaurant
Warehouse
Auto showroom, bakery, clothing store, blacksmith
Shop, hardware store
General store, department store, marketplace,
trading post
Café, bar, roadhouse, tavern
Warehouse, commercial storage
Trade (archeology)
Cache, site with evidence of trade, storage pit
Meeting hall
Grange, union hall, pioneer hall, hall of other fraternal
or patriotic or political organization
Facility of literary, social, or garden club
Department store
SOCIAL
Clubhouse
Civic
GOVERNMENT
Capitol
Facility of volunteer or public service organization
such as the American Red Cross
Statehouse, assembly building
City Hall
City hall, town hall
Correctional facility
Police station, jail, prison
Fire Station
Firehouse
Government office
Municipal building
Diplomatic building
Embassy, consulate
Custom house
Custom house
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CATEGORY
EDUCATION
RELIGION
Post office
Post office
SUBCATEGORY
Public works
EXAMPLES
Public works
Courthouse
County courthouse, federal courthouse
School
College
Schoolhouse, academy, secondary school, grammar
school, trade or technical school
University, college, junior college
Library
Library
Research facility
Laboratory, observatory, planetarium
Education-related
housing
Religious facility
College dormitory, housing at boarding schools
Church school
Church, temple, synagogue, cathedral, mission,
temple, mound, shrine
Astronomical observation post, intaglio, petroglyph
site
Religious academy or school
Church-related res.
Parsonage, convent, rectory
Cemetery
Burying ground, burial site, cemetery, ossuary
Graves/burials
Burial cache, burial mound, grave
Mortuary
Theater
Mortuary site, funeral home, cremation area,
crematorium
Cinema, movie theatre, playhouse
Auditorium
Hall, auditorium
Museum
Museum, art gallery, exhibition hall
Music facility
Concert-hall, opera house, bandstand, dancehall
Sports facility
Outdoor recreation
Gymnasium, swimming pool, tennis court, playing
field, stadium
Park, campground, picnic area, hiking trail
Fair
Amusement park, county fairground
Monument/marker
Commemorative marker or monument
Work of art
Sculpture, carving, statue, mural, rock art
Processing
Meatpacking plant, cannery, smokehouse,
brewery, winery, food processing site,
gathering site, tobacco barn
Granary, silo, wine cellar, storage site, tobacco
warehouse, cotton warehouse
Hunting and kill site, stockyard, barn, chicken coop,
hunting corral, hunting run, apiary
Greenhouse, plant observatory, garden
Ceremonial site
FUNERARY
RECREATION AND
CULTURE
AGRICULTURE /
SUBSISTENCE
Storage
Animal facility
Horticultural fact.
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Agricultural
outbuilding
Well house, wagon shed, tool shed, barn
CATEGORY
SUBCATEGORY
EXAMPLES
TRANSPORTATION
Rail-related
Railroad, train depot, locomotive, streetcar line,
railroad bridge
Parkway, highway, bridge, toll gate, parking garage
Road-related
(vehicular)
Pedestrian-related
Boardwalk, walkway, trail
WORK IN PROGRESS
(Use this category when work is in progress
UNKNOWN
VACANT / NOT IN USE
(Use this category when property is not being used)
OTHER
Fence
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Appendix 2: DATA CATEGORIES FOR ARCHITECTURAL CLASSIFICATION
MID-19th CENTURY
Early Romanesque Revival
Greek Revival
Gothic Revival
Early Gothic Revival
Italian Villa
Exotic Revival
Egyptian Revival, Moorish Revival
Octagon Mode
LATE VICTORIAN
Victorian or High Victorian Eclectic
Gothic
High Victorian gothic, Second Gothic Revival
Italianate
Victorian or High Victorian Italianate
Second Empire
Mansard
Queen Anne
Queen Anne Revival, Queen Anne-Eastlake
Stick/Eastlake
Eastern Stick, High Victorian Eastlake
Shingle Style
LATE 19th AND 20th
CENTURY REVIVALS
Romanesque
Romanesque Revival, Richardsonian Romanesque
Renaissance
Renaissance Revival, Romano-Tuscan Mode,
North Italian or Italian Renaissance, French
Renaissance, Second Renaissance Revival
Beaux Arts
Beaux Arts Classicism
Colonial Revival
Georgian Revival
Classical Revival
Neo-Classical Revival
Tudor revival
Jacobcan or Jocabethan Revival, Elizabethan
Revival
Collegiate Gothic
Lath Gothic Revival
Mission/Spanish
Colonial Revival
Italian Renaissance
Spanish Revival, Mediterranean Revival
French Renaissance
Pueblo
LATE
19th
AND EARLY
20th
CENTURY AMERICAN
MOVEMENTS
Sullivanesque
Prairie School
Commercial Style
Chicago
Skyscraper
Bungalow/Craftsma
n
Western Stick, Bungaloid
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MODERN MOVEMENT
New formalism, Neo-Expressionism, Brutalism,
California Style or Ranch Style, Post-Modern,
Wrightian
Moderne
Modernistic, Streamlined Moderne,
Art Moderne
Mission
International Style
Art Deco
OTHER
MIXED
More than three styles from different periods
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Appendix 3: GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPING HISTORIC CONTEXT
Identify and provide facts about one or more themes of history to which the property relates
through its historic uses, activities, associations, and physical characteristics. These facts
should be organized by theme, geographical place, and periods of time. Facts may relate to
other properties having similar associations or characteristics and selecting in the same
place and time.
Explain how the event or pattern of events made an important contribution to the history of
the community, state, or nation, and how related types of properties reflect these events, for
example, how the advent of the railroad affected the growth and character of a town in the
late 19th century and is represented today by the 1870 depot.
Explain why the person with whom the property is associated is important to the history of
the community, state, or nation. Identify also other properties associated with the person
and explain their role in the career of the person, for example, how an author who depicted
the people, events, and places of her region achieved statewide recognition and how a rustic
mountain retreat and boarding house where she wrote and found inspiration are the
surviving properties best associated with her life and career.
Type or method of construction: Explain why the type, period or method of construction
represents architectural features that are significant in the development of the community,
state, or nation, for example, how a local variation of a split-log I-house represents a once
common but now rare housing type of the early 19th century regionally and is a good
example of its type.
Work of a master: Provide facts about the career and work of the artist, architect, engineer,
or landscape architect to explain how the person was accomplished in his or her field and
made contributions to the art, architecture, or landscape architecture of the community,
state, or nation, for example, how an architect achieved recognition for his homes of wealthy
merchants and produced a large number of middle and upper class residences in the late
1700’s in a prosperous seaport.
High artistic values; describe the quality of artistry or craftsmanship present in comparable
works in the community, state, or nation, for example, how the data on hunting and
gathering practices and technology of a Late Archaic culture will broaden the knowledge and
understanding of the culture’s occupation regionally.
PROPERTIES OF LOCAL SIGNIFICANCE: Identify the local events and activities relating to the
property and discuss their importance to local history.
PROPERTIES OF STATE SIGNIFICANCE: Discuss how the property reflects the history of the
State and the ways in which the property is one of the best of similarly associated properties
in the State to represent the theme.
PROPERTIES OF NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE: Discuss how the property reflects an important
aspect of the history of the Nation as a whole or has contributed in an exceptional way to the
diverse geographical and cultural character of the Nation. Also, explain how the property
relates to other properties nationwide having similar associations.
19
Historic Landmark Nomination Form
The Village of Oak Park
Village Hall
123 Madison Street
Oak Park, Illinois 60302-4272
708.383.6400
Fax 708.383.6692
TTY 708.383.0048
[email protected]
This form is for use in nominating Oak Park Landmarks. Complete each item by marking “x” in the appropriate box or by
entering the information requested. If any item does not apply to the property being documented, enter “N/A” for “not
applicable.” For functions, architectural classification, materials, and areas of significance, enter only categories and
subcategories from the instructions. Place additional entries and narrative items on continuation sheets. Use a typewriter, word processor or computer to complete all items.
NAME OF PROPERTY
Historic name
Common name
LOCATION
Street & number
Oak Park
Illinois
IL
Cook
031
City or town
State
Code
County
Code
Zip code
CLASSIFICATION
Ownership of Property (Check as many boxes as apply)
l Private
l Public: Local
l Public: State
l Public: Federal
l Site
l Structure
Category of Property (Check only one box)
l Building(s)
l District
Number of Resources within Property
Buildings
Sites
Structures
l Exterior
Type of Designation
l Object
Contributing
Noncontributing
Objects
Total
l Public interior
FUNCTION OR USE
Historic Functions (Enter categories from instructions)
Current Functions
Category
Subcategory
Category
Subcategory
Category
Subcategory
(Enter categories from instructions)
DESCRIPTION
Architectural Classification (Enter categories from instructions)
Materials
(Enter categories from instructions)
Foundation
Narrative Description
Roof
Walls
(Describe the historic and current condition of the property on one or more continuation sheets)
Other
STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE
Areas of Significance
Period of Significance
Architect/Builder
Narrative Statement of Significance
(Explain the significance of the property on one or more continuation sheets)
MAJOR BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES
Bibliography (Cite the books, articles, and other sources used in preparing this form on one or more continuation sheets)
Representation in Existing Surveys
Legal Description
(Attach additional pages if necessary)
Official Action
Form Prepared By
Name/Title
Organization
Date of Owner Consent
Telephone
Date
Date of Public Hearing
Result
Street & Number
City or Town
State
Zip Code
Property Owner(s)
Name
Telephone
Street & Number
City or Town
State
Zip Code
Applicant
Result
Telephone
Name
Street & Number
City or Town
Signature
Date of Village Board Action
State
Zip Code
Date