National Register of Historic Places Registration Form

NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service
National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
This form is for use in nominating or requesting determinations for individual properties and districts. See instructions in National Register
Bulletin, How to Complete the National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. If any item does not apply to the property being
documented, enter "N/A" for "not applicable." For functions, architectural classification, materials, and areas of significance, enter only
categories and subcategories from the instructions.
1. Name of Property
Historic name: Paint Creek Cider Mill, Paint Creek Mill
Other names/site number: Hemingway Mill, Goodison Mill, Oakland Mill
Name of related multiple property listing:
_ N/A_______________________________________________________
(Enter "N/A" if property is not part of a multiple property listing
____________________________________________________________________________
2. Location
Street & number: 4480 Orion Road, Oakland Township, Michigan, 48306
City or town: Oakland Township, Hamlet of Goodison State: MI County: Oakland
Not For Publication:
Vicinity:
____________________________________________________________________________
3. State/Federal Agency Certification
As the designated authority under the National Historic Preservation Act, as amended,
I hereby certify that this
nomination ___ request for determination of eligibility meets
the documentation standards for registering properties in the National Register of Historic
Places and meets the procedural and professional requirements set forth in 36 CFR Part 60.
In my opinion, the property ___ meets ___ does not meet the National Register Criteria. I
recommend that this property be considered significant at the following
level(s) of significance:
___national
___statewide
Applicable National Register Criteria:
_ _A
_ _B
_ _C
_ _ local
___D
Signature of certifying official/Title:
Date
______________________________________________
State or Federal agency/bureau or Tribal Government
In my opinion, the property
meets
does not meet the National Register criteria.
Signature of commenting official:
Date
Title :
State or Federal agency/bureau
or Tribal Government
1
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
______________________________________________________________________________
4. National Park Service Certification
I hereby certify that this property is:
entered in the National Register
determined eligible for the National Register
determined not eligible for the National Register
removed from the National Register
other (explain:) _____________________
____________________________________________________________________
Signature of the Keeper
Date of Action
____________________________________________________________________________
5. Classification
Ownership of Property
(Check as many boxes as apply.)
Private:
Public – Local
X
X
Public – State
Public – Federal
Category of Property
(Check only one box.)
Building(s)
District
Site
Structure
X
X
X
Object
Sections 1-6 page 2
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Number of Resources within Property
Contributing
__1_(Mill Building)
Noncontributing
_________
buildings
Mill Race Trail, Mill site
sites
2-Sluice Boxes at
Gallagher and at Headrace
structures
_
_____________
objects
_1__Contributing
____3__________
Total
Number of contributing resources previously listed in the National Register ___0______
6. Function or Use
Historic Functions
Agriculture/ Subsistence
Industry/ Processing/ Extraction
Transportation / Rail-related
Commerce Trade/ Restaurant
Current Functions
Social/ Meeting Hall
Recreation and Culture
Commerce/ Trade/ Business
Government/ Government Offices
Domestic/ Township site
Sections 1-6 page 3
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
_____________________________________________________________________________
7. Description
Architectural Classification
Modern
Other: Swiss Chalet
___________________
Materials:
Principal exterior materials of the property:
Wood, Brick, Glass, Metal (Copper, Steel) Stone, Asphalt, Concrete
Narrative Description
(Describe the historic and current physical appearance and condition of the property. Describe
contributing and noncontributing resources if applicable. Begin with a summary paragraph that
briefly describes the general characteristics of the property, such as its location, type, style,
method of construction, setting, size, and significant features. Indicate whether the property has
historic integrity.)
______________________________________________________________________________
Summary Paragraph
The nominated property, initial construction of 1958, has unique architectural Modern
style with Swiss Chalet influence, by well-known architectural firms Giffels and Rossetti. The
owner, Mr. Dale O. Miller Sr., a local entrepreneur, originally contracted architectural firm
Rossetti and Valet, Inc. to design a rehabilitation of a 110-year old gristmill into a functioning
cider mill. However, the building was dismantled with some material salvaged, and a new
modern design replaced the old mill. The architectural firm hired for the work was Giffels and
Rossetti. D. Miller envisioned having a community cider mill across from his relocated
Rochester Gear Works factory that manufactured specialized worms for precision instruments
for World War II.
Page 4
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
___________________________________________________________________________
Narrative Description
The Paint Creek Cider Mill sits on the bank of Paint Creek, a tributary to the Clinton River
Watershed, in the hamlet of Goodison, Oakland Township, Oakland County, Michigan.
Originally a gristmill for most of its existence, it became a cider mill following reconstruction in
the later 1950s, and today serves multi-purposes, including governmental offices. The milling
heritage at this location has been a constant fixture since the first mill was built by Needham
Hemingway in 1835. In 1945, Mr. Dale O. Miller Sr., purchased the 110- year old gristmill and
had hoped to restore the building and convert into cider mill operations and harness the waterpower from the Paint Creek with use of a breast-shot waterwheel. Dale O. Miller Sr. had great
interest in technology, electrical generation and milling history. In 1945, when he purchased the
mill site, he also purchased the closing box-factory across Orion Road, were he moved his
Rochester Gear Works business. This business was the only industrial industry in Goodison, and
remains a working Gear factory today. D. Miller was a significant person in the development of
Goodison, bringing people to the area, and providing jobs. The gristmill’s structural support was
compromised, and in the early 1950s, the mill was deconstructed. Original hand-hewn timbers
and building stock were salvaged for Miller’s vision to construct a cider mill. The well-known
architectural firms of Giffels & Valet Inc., Giffels and Rossetti together played a role, while
Giffels and Rossetti designed the current day Modern building. Contact with L. Gino Rossetti
revealed the mill building was one of his first design projects as a young architect. The Modern
architectural style reflects both a contemporary 1950-60s feel and Swiss Chalet influence in the
bold forms and crisp details of the two component sections, with their long slanting roofs,
expansive overhangs, vertical board siding, stonework, and multitude of large windows. The
location of the cider mill sits on the site of the first gristmill built in 1835 by Needham
Hemmingway, one of the first settlers to the area. It was later owned and operated by William
Goodison, giving its name to the settlement. Today, the Paint Creek Cider Mill continues to be a
central part of the community’s social core, celebrating the milling (grist, saw, flour, grain,
apples) history at this location - one hundred-eighty years later. The Paint Creek Cider Mill is the
landmark building just as Orion Road heads north and crosses the Paint Creek twice, and then
bends to the left, slowing traffic that weaves through the hamlet of Goodison. To the north, is
several historic houses scattered along Collins Road and a Church. Directly across the road is a
brick one-story factory previously owned by D. Miller as The Rochester Gear Works, and now
called Lyon Gear. Further north is a two-story general country market, garage, and two
veterinary clinics. Goodison has surprisingly retained its rural, agrarian character, just four miles
north of neighboring cities Rochester and Rochester Hills.
Page 5
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Paint Creek Cider Mill
The Paint Creek Cider Mill is a modern 20th century revival with influence of Swiss Chalet
style. The extensive use of large windows with open fenestration, gable roof with wide eaves,
exterior balconies, are all characteristic of Swiss Chalet architecture. The structure was built in a
series of three stages with two separated buildings; one front-gable form and one side-gable
form, which were later joined by a connecting, very long, addition. Construction started in 1958
of the two-story, front-gabled wheel room which was located near the original site of
Hemingway’s gristmill, and measures 26’ x 70. The second two-story building to the east was
designed as the cider mill, built in 1960-1961 with dimensions of 49’ x 65’. There is a 20’ x 30’
addition on the south side of the building. In 1968 a permit was pulled by D. Miller for the
addition of a 61’ long gallery “bridge” addition, joining the wheel room the cider mill buildings
together. When the bridge connection was completed in 1969, the entire buildings dimensions
were approximately 196’ long and 49’ wide (at cider mill) and 26’ wide (at the wheel room).
Steel framing was used with expansive steel triangular trusses. The gable ends structural
framing are of king post design. The roof line of each gabled section is a salt box style, with a
raking board, absent cornice, and projecting eaves spanning some 8’ beyond the foot print. Steel
brackets are spaced approximately every 10’ on the roof. The brackets are squared off 10” x 4”
I-beams. The saltbox roof overhang covers an additional porch area of the cider mill and also the
building main entrance. Square copper gutters compliment the building’s mass. The roofing
deck is made of wood 2” x 6”-7” tongue and grooved salvaged from another building demo in
the 1950s. The roof is clad in asphalt shingles, dark grey in color and shaped in a small square
pattern. An uncoursed, cut fieldstone chimney protrudes through the roof line of the wheel
room, west of the ridgepole.
The foundation is poured concrete with heavy course aggregate in addition to concrete block
faced with large uncoursed cut fieldstone, some veneers. A 15’steel I-beam is used as a sill plate
along the bridge. The framing of the building is done with steel I-beams in different sizes. The
framing rafters are 11” x 4” which span the length of the building horizontally. 2” x 6”-7” wood
planks run vertical between the rafters. Huge trusses made with angle iron steel beams run form
roof to floor in triangular support. The framing ends are king post design with fans of steel
beams to the roof ends. Also large mostly square 9” x 9” up to 15” x 15” wood beams saved
from the original mill are used for vertical corner support throughout the first floor level, and
some ornamental use. On the interior of the roof overhang above the porch, five steel I-beams are
spaced 20’ apart with wood rafters. The steel beams and roofing planks were purchased by Dale
O. Miller from the sale of material when the Walter Reuther Ford Trade School closed.
Page 6
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
The exterior walls are vertical plank rough sawn wood, board and batten siding. The exterior
siding is painted dark brown. Red brick is documented on the lower walls at three feet in height.
The south rear building wall (Creek side) is orange brick. An addition of an exterior stairway,
south side of the wheel room, is used for access to the 2nd floor, and is brick with three small
glass-block windows, diagonally placed to follow the interior stairwell for lighting.
At the main northern entrance under the porch covering, there are two entrances; one to the
cider mill and the other to the local offices meeting space and upstairs offices. There is a third
doorway that is the exit for the cider mill. The porch area flooring is made with grey square brick
pavers, designed in a circular pattern, installed in 2007 when Oakland Township converted the
restaurant section into office and community meeting space.
A concrete ledge balcony is located on the north façade on the bridge gallery between two
floors of windows. This 3’ balcony has hardware for six flagpoles and on occasion American
Flags decorate the building’s exterior. A south facing deck area, sandwiched between the
building and the Paint Creek, overlooks a steep, 15’ embankment, is under construction and
slated for replacement of concrete material to withstand damp creek-side conditions.
There is a massive field stone chimney rising 50’ on the north facing façade of the wheel
room, measuring 108” wide and protruding 28” from the building which took Miller one year
and seven months to complete. The chimney rises approximately 10’ beyond the roof line. A
concrete block chimney is located to the south side of the cider mill building for purposes as an
exhaust. The cider mill also has a service door on the south side and a door that enters directly to
a large walk-in refrigerator. The main entrance to office space opens by double door into a
ceramic tiled vestibule.
Windows are a main feature of the Paint Creek Cider Mill, much like the style of Swiss
Chalet architecture. The two-story gallery has large 5’x5’ fixed windows on both sides spanning
the entire length of the passage. There are eight windows on the 2nd floor and nine windows on
the 1st floor and they each have 12-lights per window in balanced fenestration. The façade of the
wheel room has ten of the same fixed, 12-light windows in a five-over-five symmetry. To the
right of the first floor entrance are four unique steel casement windows salvaged from the
Webber estate in Detroit (affiliated with Hudson’s). There are less East facing windows on the
building with only three casement windows on the second level and one ten-light fixed window
on the first level. There are no windows on the west side of the building as that view is the
elongated roofing pitch. The 2007 building project added six skylight windows on the cider mill
roofing pitch facing north on the Orion Road side. These skylights offer interior lighting for
upstairs office space.
Page 7
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
The floor plan for the building is different on each level. The first floor is open with large
meeting rooms and an open gallery including; two small storage areas, (one for mechanical the
other for supplies). The current cider mill restaurant café is located on the first level with a large
kitchen, counter space, seating area, and two accessible bathrooms. The second level is office
space, two accessible bathrooms, storage, and kitchen. The office space over the gallery
protrudes 8’over the 1st floor space.
Much of the interior walls and ceilings are finished with Pecky Cypress cut wood in 10”
vertical planks. Pecky Cypress is wood that appears to have worm holes throughout making it
prized for its decorative purpose. Other wall finishes in the parlor meeting area which is a
smaller conference room, consists of solid oak wainscot, salvaged from Prohibition Era mansions
in Grosse Pointe, Michigan. The Paint Creek Cider Mill continues its history of benefiting from
the reuse of a variety of salvaged material.
On the first level there are stained glass windows with a colorful trout fishing scene, designed
by the Williams Art Glass Studio Oxford, Michigan (Michigan Stained Glass Census 2003.0011)
working with artist Art Nowoski in 2000. Other decorative interior features include oak plinth
door trim hand-made by William G. Mancour, and a canvas mural painted by Jim Jeffries,
depicting the Detroit Urban Railway (DUR) stop in Goodison on its way to Flint, Michigan. The
Paint Creek Cider Mill building has other local heritage displayed, including 1916 then owner,
Maurice Collin’s Blacksmith anvil and the original wooden counter from William Goodison’s
General Store, which was located next to the mill ca. 1870s. As the Paint Creek Cider Mill was
built in the same location of Goodison’s only gristmill, one large grind stone remains on site near
the waterwheel, paying homage for one hundred-five years of grinding grist. Another valuable
asset located in the wheel room near the water wheel is the original 1890’s generator that will be
discussed more later.
The flooring varies throughout the building; on the first floor there is wide plank pine
flooring running the length of the gallery, which was installed when the building was
constructed. The wheel room has carpet laid over an 8” concrete slab, which also covers a
section of the turbine chamber. There is an open steel grate that exposed the gears mechanics for
the water wheel. The turbine pit remains under the floor of the wheel room. The wheel room
also has a movable track called a crane way, in the first floor ceiling for hoisting mechanical
equipment in and out of the pits.
Dale O. Miller installed a steel breast-shot waterwheel made by the Fitz Waterwheel
Company in 1957. The rotating wheel was connected to an 1890’s Thomas A. Edison Bi-polar
generator with serial number 455, said to have been donated by Henry Ford I. In 1990, the steel
Page 8
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
wheel was replaced with a wooden wheel, hand machined with forty-five oak paddles and
weighing over two tons. Additional electricity was added when the buildings were built in the
1960s-1970s. There are three wall units of 1200 amp pull boxes for electricity for the entire
building. Wiring is housed inside metal conduit throughout the building. Lighting fixtures vary
with some dating back to the 1960s, while the gallery lights are whimsical dropped canvas
shades decorated with carved trout fish. Many of the new lights for office use in the second level
are standard 2’ x 4’ florescent ceiling boxes.
Page 9
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
_________________________________________________________________
8. Statement of Significance
Applicable National Register Criteria
Criteria: The quality of significance in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering,
and culture is present in districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects that possess integrity of
location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association.
A. Property is associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the
broad patterns of our history.
X
B. Property is associated with the lives of persons significant in our past.
X
C. Property embodies the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of
construction or represents the work of a master, or possesses high artistic values,
or represents a significant and distinguishable entity whose components lack
individual distinction.
D. Property has yielded, or is likely to yield, information important in prehistory or
history.
Criteria Considerations
(Mark “x” in all the boxes that apply.)
A. Owned by a religious institution or used for religious purposes
B. Removed from its original location
C. A birthplace or grave
D. A cemetery
E. A reconstructed building, object, or structure
F. A commemorative property
G. Less than 50 years old or achieving significance within the past 50 years
Page 10
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Areas of Significance:
Architecture
Commerce
Period of Significance:
1960-2005: Paint Creek Cider Mill and Restaurant
Significant Dates:
1958-1960: Construction of Paint Creek Cider Mill (wheel room and cider mill
buildings)—new design, same location
1969: Connecting Gallery/Bridge constructed
1976: William Mancour purchase
1996: Raymond Nicholson purchase
2005: Donation to Charter Township of Oakland
2007: Renovations for ADA compliance
Original Gristmill:
June 4, 1825: Hemingway land purchase
1835: Mill built
1836: Millrace dug by Hemingway
1866: Purchase by William Goodison
1916: Purchase by Maurice Collins
1945- Change of Ownership to Dale O. Miller
1952: Deconstruction and beam storage
Significant Persons:
Miller, Dale Orville
Cultural Affiliation
Undefined
Architect/Builder:
Giffels & Rossetti
(Ray Giffels)
(Rossetti, Louie Gino)
Dziurman, John from John Dziurman Architects Ltd.
Page 11
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Narrative Statement of Significance (Provide at least one paragraph for each area of
significance.)
The Paint Creek Cider Mill meets National Register criteria B and C. The mill meets criterion B
(Property is associated with the lives of persons significant in our past) at the local level due the
association to Dale Orville Miller Sr. who purchased the mill site in 1945. Since the construction
of the Paint Creek Cider Mill, a number of people help highlight its history, however, Miller
built the Modern day mill, which has brought many people to Goodison over the years while still
maintaining its importance within a local historical context.
Dale Orville Miller Sr. (18 July 1897 – 17 Oct. 1986)
On April 21, 1945, Dale Orville Miller bought from the heirs of Maurice Collins, the box
factory, general store, blacksmith shop, and old mill and millrace water-rights. An entrepreneur
from Birmingham, Michigan, Miller started Rochester Gear Works, located in Rochester,
Michigan on Woodward Avenue. He came to Goodison to buy land and build a modern 15,000
square foot factory to relocate from Rochester and accommodate his growing business.
Miller was born in a log cabin just two miles south of Belmore, Indiana, delivered by Dr Adrain
for a fee of $5.00. (Miller’s Musing Collected Memories pg. 2). He attended Ohio State
University, graduating in 1920 with a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering. Miller entered into the
oil burner business and started a company called Simplex Engineering and sold three different
types of oil burners. He sold domestic burners to Edsel Ford’s in Grosse Pointe and the Booths
family, yet was interested in pursuing the sale of industrial burners. He purchased a franchise
from Bunting Iron Works in Berkeley, California for semi-industrial oil burners that would burn
heavy #6 oil. “We installed them in Temple Beth El, a synagogue designed by Albert Kahn, the
Alden Park Manor of 320 apartments, many theatres, churches and industrial buildings. It
burned the cheapest #6 fuel oil.” (Miller’s Musings pg. 37).
Miller then purchased a bronze and aluminum foundry in Imlay City, Michigan called Brisk
Foundry & Machine Company. He talked Mr. Charles Schneider from Toledo, Ohio, out of
retirement to manage the foundry. Mr. Schneider’s many years of experience determined
temperatures of the metals when poured and his expertise paid off. Miller was contacted by
Fisher Body to machine bronze worms for the 90MM anti-aircraft gun for WWII. From the
Rochester Gear Works brochure states “This [90MM] gun is capable of firing a total distance
into the air of seven miles. These guns were usually set up in batteries of four and all aimed and
fired simultaneously, smothering the plane in shrapnel. Rochester Gear Works manufactured
two manganese aluminum bronze worms for the leveling mechanism for each gun, a total of over
Page 12
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
2,200 guns. These parts were machined to a tolerance of .0001”. These worms weigh
approximately 140 pounds each finished. It is estimated that a variation of .001” at the gun
results in an error of the necessity of extreme accuracy on machining these parts.” Attachment.
Six months after the end of WWII, Miller made his purchase in Goodison with the old flour
mill across the street. A third generation German descendant originally spelled Muller, he
intended to continue his milling heritage by turning the gristmill into a cider mill. From the
Rochester Era, December 6, 1945 article Rochester Gear Works Ready on Saturday, invitations
were sent to celebrate the completion of new modern plant with 15,000 square feet of floor
space. The article brags of the most modern and best possible construction for the comfort of
production men. There was air conditioning, a modern cooling system fed by water from a large
deep well. The ventilation changed air every six minutes and filtered dust and fumes for pure air
at all times.
Miller had more plans for Goodison. Another vision he had was to rebuild the old mill,
across the street from his factory, to provide electric lights in Goodison. Statement from Miller,
“We are going to clean up the whole place, rebuild the 125-year old mill, install a modern waterwheel and a modern generator to produce electricity for lighting the streets and buildings around
Goodison, using the old millrace which the early settlers dug 125-years ago.” (Rochester Era,
1945). *Note: The original gristmill was built in 1835 so it was 110 years old in 1945.
Miller was also a collector of antiques; many of his collections are displayed in and around
the current mill site. These include Silas Overpack logging wheel, showcasing Michigan’s
lumber industry; a carved statue of an Indian, which is one of five statues originally located in
front of Royal Oak’s Hedges Wigwam Restaurant; a large bronze bell cast in 1847 by the
Meneely Foundry, West Troy, New York; and an 200 year old hand carved “screw” press with
massive hand-hewn beams.
Page 13
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Criteria C:
Property embodies the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction or
represents the work of a master, or possesses high artistic values, or represents a significant and
distinguishable entity whose components lack individual distinction.
The Paint Creek Cider Mill evidences the single most important building in Goodison for
several reasons. The Modern design is unique to the community and stands alone in its
architectural features and construction technique more industrial for Goodison. The volume of
separated spaces and roof lines are designed to envelope and embrace these distinct features.
Another unique feature is that the building design incorporates a “bridge” between two major
components of the wheel room and cider mill, under which the water from the millrace tailrace
flowed (hence the term bridge) back into the Paint Creek. The design incorporated existing manmade features such as the millrace and use of waterpower, as well as making use of existing
natural features as the black locust tree was incorporated into growing through the cider mill
roof. Individually the separate forms would not add up to the prominent building standing today,
yet united they contribute to the significance, history, and setting in the hamlet of Goodison. The
building is a central feature and anchor within the local community of Oakland Township.
Well know architectural firm from Detroit, Michigan, reused components of the original
structure, and melded into the current mill. The architectural firms have separated, both leading
designers and both continue in existence to this day. Giffels Associates, Inc. is located in
Southfield, Michigan and Rossetti Associates is located in Detroit, Michigan. The later firm was
founded by L. Gino Rossetti in 1969, and is still a family owned business. L. Gino Rossetti has
won national awards for his design work and the Paint Creek Cider Mill was one of his first
projects as a young architect while working under the direction of Giffels.
______________________________________________________________________________
Statement of Significance Summary Paragraph
Organized in 1827 as one of the original twenty-five Townships within the formation of the
Michigan Territory, Oakland Township remains among the oldest. The rolling hills and good soil
attracted early settlers to the area by Paint Creek. Needham Hemingway, a farmer from Monroe
County, New York, came to Michigan in 1824. Hemingway purchased a total of 80-acres from
the United States Government in Section 28 on June 4, 1825. He built the original gristmill in
1835 and dammed Paint Creek, digging a millrace one-half mile to the north to divert water from
Paint Creek to his gristmill. Due to rolling topography and drop in elevations, the millrace had a
very strong current. A square box flume, or also called sluice, funneled water into a large
Page 14
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
penstock that diverted the water to a ‘drum’ or ‘flag’ wheel, into the lower-level of the gristmill,
which geared shafts that turned two grind-stones.
N. Hemingway was born in Whitestown, New York November 1, 1793. Hemingway moved
with his parents to Chili, Monroe County, New York at seventeen. He married Merrilla, with
their union producing eleven children. In 1824 Needham, Merrilla and four of their children
traveled by ox team to Buffalo, New York and crossed Lake Erie to Michigan. They settled in
the Pontiac area for a time before making the move to Paint Creek (Goodison) in 1827, where he
constructed a shanty for his family. Not only did he build the first recorded gristmill in
Goodison, he also built the first frame house in the township, and platted the area in 1843. His
association with the settlement of Goodison includes engineering a millrace without the use of a
millpond above the dam, to use water-power for grinding grains, and later for sawing timbers
which contributed to the development of the surrounding area of Oakland Township. The Native
American Indian trail, widened for the passage of wagons and later named Territorial Road, used
timbers for bridges sawn at the mill.
In 1844 Hemingway sold the gristmill and the surrounding eighty acres to his two sons
Freeman and Henry. Between 1846 until 1854, the property passed through several other owners
before William Goodison purchased it from William Green in 1866 for $3,600. W. Goodison
granted the Detroit & Bay City Railroad (later the Michigan Central) an easement through the
west section in 1872. After the laying of railroad tracks, Goodison built a general store east of
the mill, with a post office established in 1874. That same year saw the railroad establish the first
“flag station” next to the gristmill; the stop and settlement became known as Goodison Station.
In 1876, Goodison built an addition of 18-feet to the south side of the mill, extending its length
to 70-feet, improving the operations to accommodate a greater crop yield. A sawmill was also
added just slightly east of the gristmill, within the series of buildings along the Paint Creek.
William Goodison was born in Manchester, Lancashire, England May 16, 1806. He married
Susannah, also from Manchester, and around 1832 they immigrated to New Jersey, and later
moving to Oakland County, Michigan. W. Goodison helped to further establish the settlement
that Hemingway initiated by purchasing the gristmill and eighty acres of property in 1866. An
easement through the west section of the property granted passage to the Detroit & Bay City
Railroad (later Michigan Central which was a subsidiary of New York Central), becoming the
first railroad “flag station,” in Oakland Township. W. Goodison also ran the general store and
post office built slightly east of the gristmill. With each of these developments the settlement
continued to grow and the rail stop quickly became known as Goodison Station.
Page 15
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
After W. Goodison died in 1879, his estate divided the land, eventually selling to Joseph
Ramie and Samuel Barnes in 1881. Samuel Barnes quit claimed 60-acres of the property to his
wife, selling the other 8-acres. The Barnes family sold the mill in 1913 after 32 years of
ownership. Partners, Cramer and Bingham, bought the gristmill from the Barnes family, was
renamed Oakland Mills, and produced pure stone ground, buck wheat flour. The new owners,
Cramer and Bingham, realizing a good head and flow of water from the Paint Creek millrace,
added a Leffel & Samson Turbine to provide even more water-power to the mill.
In 1916, Maurice Collins, the local blacksmith, purchased the mill and general store, and he
added an additional sawmill adjacent to the south of the gristmill. At Maurice Collins death in
1941, the mill ceased to grind grist, yet adaptive machinery was still used for other productivity,
such as making potato crates and frames for shipping automobile wheels. From 1941 to 1945,
Ellen Collins (his wife) and Clara and Frank Voll (his daughter and son-in-law) owned and
operated the mill, general store, blacksmith shop, and a box factory located across the road
(which had been a garage with gasoline pumps, and later became part of the Rochester Gear
Works).1
In 1945, entrepreneur Dale O. Miller, Sr. purchased sixty acres of the former HemingwayGoodison property on Collins Road from the Volls. This included the original gristmill, general
store, sawmill and blacksmith shop, including the factory across Territorial Road that became
Rochester Gear Works. During World War II, the mill building became a box operation and
storage for apples and potato crates. Miller hoped to restore the mill building and convert it into a
cider mill with a self-sustaining electrical generation plant, utilizing available water power.
From a statement in The Rochester Era on December 6, 1945, Miller is quoted, “We are going to
clean up the whole place, rebuild the 125-year old mill, and install a modern water-wheel and a
modern generator to produce electricity for lighting the streets and buildings around Goodison,
using the old millrace which the early settlers dug 125 years ago.” However by 1952, the
structure had deteriorated beyond repair. By mid-1950s, Miller dismantled the building and
salvaged original material to reuse in the construction of the new mill.
D. Miller Sr. worked with architect Ray Giffels, founder of and partner with Giffels, Valet,
and Rossetti (Giffels &Valet Inc., Giffels and Rossetti, and Rossetti Associates). Raymond
Francis (Ray) Giffels, was a neighbor of Miller’s in Birmingham, Michigan. The new building
would house Miller’s vision of a cider mill, restaurant, and electrical generation plant using the
water-power from the Paint Creek Millrace. D. Miller Sr. had recently traveled to Switzerland,
and found a new admiration for the Swiss Architecture, which has contributed to the Modern
design of the current mill building. Young architect, L. Gino Rossetti (Gino) worked for Giffels
1
Kelly, Delta. Some History of the Goodison Settlement. Research notes. October 1979
Page 16
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
in the 1950s and worked on the designs the new building. Communication from Gino Rossetti
expressed the mill building was his first building design project while in his twenties working for
Mr. Ray Giffels. G. Rossetti stated D. Miller wanted a unique design with open space to attract
tourists for cider and donuts. Early concept renderings in pastel medium, donated to the Historic
District Commission by Mr. William G. Mancour, illustrate the Modern style building
renderings. The architectural site sketch, which includes the late 1960s bridge connector
addition, bears the stamp ‘Giffels and Rossetti.’ D. Miller Sr. described in his memoirs the early
plans, “One very desirable thing, Detroit installed a 54” diameter concrete sanitary sewer clean
out to serve Lake Orion and Oxford. Goodison had them cross under the Michigan Central RR
tracks to get a sewer up to the school. It crossed the lot of the old Flour Mill and we took out a
permit for the Rochester Gear Co. and the Old Mill with the idea of a cider mill and a restaurant
at this location. We found a 36’ x 36’ hydraulic press which we over-hauled with a new leather
hydraulic cylinder piston. All of these things sound simple but it took about fifteen years to
design and build the building, furnish the business and get equipment installed.”
Miller purchased steel I-beams to frame the building from the sale of material when the
Walter Reuther Ford Trade School closed. From personal records of D. Miller Sr., “Everything
was used. Nobody could afford new steel and machinery. The concrete was new but that’s all.
Walter Reuther closed the Ford Trade School and we bought all their steel trusses and the 2” X
6” tongue and grooved roofing.”
The complex of three united structures, were built in succession beginning with the Wheel
Room in 1958, the Cider Mill in 1960, and the connecting bridge beginning from 1969. The
architectural design incorporated a five foot wide – fifteen foot diameter steel waterwheel made
in 1957 by Fitz Waterwheel Company, from King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. D. Miller Sr.
described the waterwheel, “It takes two men to lift one spoke. It rotates 10 RPM. I found a
speed increaser gear box made by the Philadelphia Gear Works. The second step was belts. The
wheel generated electricity using an 1890 Bi-Polar generator made by Thomas A. Edison (Serial
NO. 544) and donated by Henry Ford Sr. The Edison Bi-Polar D.C. 110 Volt generator runs at
about 1500 RPM, 8.6 kilowatt direct current.”
On occasion, Miller allowed his factory employees from across the road at Rochester Gear
Works, to eat their lunchtime meals in the wheel room. The “dining” room featured knob and
tube light fixtures with carbon filament bulbs and emerald green shades, all powered by the
waterwheel. Later, one of the first commercial uses in the wheel room was an antique business
called Bailiwick Gift Antiques. The antiques business was at this location for only a few years.
Page 17
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
In 1976, William G. (Jerry) and Lucy Mancour purchased the Paint Creek Cider Mill from D.
Miller Sr. Mancour’s ownership of the Paint Creek Cider Mill was from 1976 until 1996,
revving up the cider mill and establishing the restaurant. Mancour previously owned a hardware
store in West Bloomfield, Michigan that was frequented by Dale O. Miller Sr. Miller
appreciated the expertise of Mancour, they became friends, and after several years of
perseverance, Miller talked Mancour into buying the business. The Mancour family worked to
expand the cider mill operations to include a small restaurant. Cider mill operations blossomed
during this time period and became a local favorite in the Oakland County area drawing crowds
of 10,000 visitors. On fall weekends, cars packed the parking lot and lines formed while families
waited to purchase cider, donuts, and baked goods.
The 1970s and 1980s saw technological building adaptions for electrical capacity, however,
the water-power from the Paint Creek millrace continued to operate for aesthetic purposes and
was utilized for lighting the emerald green carbon filament bulbs in the wheel room. By the
1980s, W. Mancour added to the cider mill operations, the restaurant, a pub and banquet facility,
and renamed the complex the Paint Creek Cider Mill and Restaurant.
On May 16, 1982, a Historic Plaque Presentation was awarded to the Mancour family in
celebration of the Hemingway mill site, commemorating the history of the original mill. On
behalf of members from the Oakland Township Historical Society, Mrs. Alice Tomboulian
presented the plaque in a statement, “Mr. Mancour has understood the community’s goals for
Goodison as a viable commercial center within a valid historical context. Goodison has served
and should continue to serve, the business needs of Oakland Township people and our visitors
with a unique style.” Needham Hemingway’s great granddaughter, Mary Hemingway Hayes,
attended the presentation as well as several descendants of Maurice Collins. Delta Kelly, forty
year educator and local historian, well known in Oakland Township (later a school was named
after her) was also in attendance.
By the early 1990s, the 1957 steel Fitz waterwheel was showing signs of deterioration. After
attempting to find a company to restore the wheel, W. Mancour rebuilt it himself. In 1993,
Mancour replaced the Fitz Waterwheel with the wooden wheel which remains the current wheel
today. Using the Fitz steel design as a guide, he made the wooden replacement. The replica
wheel included forty-eight, hand-machined, white oak paddles, weighing over two tons. In a
Detroit Free Press article, Scott Simons, a Detroit Edison spokesperson, stated the restored
wheel could generate enough power to light two houses! The same article also noted that
Kathryn Eckert, then the State Historic Preservation Officer, indicated the rarity of an operating
waterwheel for electricity in Michigan. Mancour maintained all the working functions of
providing water-power from the Paint Creek Millrace to deliver water to his mill. He maintained
Page 18
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
the head race where the water diverted from Paint Creek at the section where the DUR tracks
ran. He also maintained the millrace, sluice box, penstock, forebay, waterwheel, turbine pit,
mechanical pit, and tailrace.
Raymond J. and Mary Nicholson purchased the complex from the Mancour family in 1996,
continuing its central gathering place for Goodison as a cider mill, restaurant, and pub. The
waterwheel functioned from 1960 until 1998, at which time an electrical switch to turn the wheel
replaced the water-powered electrical generation. At that time, the working forebay that directed
water over the wheel was disconnected, however, the mechanical pit, water chamber, and turbine
pit remain in place under the floor in the wheel room building.
R. Nicholson donated the building to Oakland Township in late 2005. The Township hired
historic architect, John Dziurman of John Dziurman Architects, Ltd. for the adaptive reuse of the
building for upstairs offices and public accessibility. An exterior housed elevator addition in
2006, provided compliance with the American’s with Disability Act, for public access to the
second level space. Current uses include: meeting space, not-for-profit offices, local government
offices, and tenant leasing the cider mill space called the Paint Creek Cider Mill LLC. Many
residents identify with the Paint Creek Cider Mill site which remains an important gathering
place for people in surrounding communities. The site is located parallel to the Paint Creek Trail,
which is also a designated portion of the State of Michigan Iron Belle Trail network.
When the mill site entered the second period of its existence in a Modern style designed
working cider mill, its history carried forward adapting with new technology and growth in the
community. Several significant features in quality workmanship include the masonry,
woodworking, and use of the original historic fabric which aid in the historic context. The
building has a sense of feeling of days long past upon entrance into the mill. The mill location
has always been associated with the names of prominent individuals such as Needham
Hemingway, original founder of the area, and William Goodison, named for the settlement.
_____________________________________________________________________________
Narrative Description
Goodison sits within Oakland Township, part of Oakland County--one of the original
counties in Michigan. The Government Land Office Survey established this as Section 28 in
1817. After Michigan gained statehood in 1837, Oakland became the township described as
Town 4 North, Range 11 East in 1837 survey maps of the United States. Goodison sits in a
valley alongside Paint Creek. Originally populated by Native Americans which included the
Ojibwa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi, early nineteenth century maps record their settlements along
Paint Creek. Numerous Native American settlements, burial sites, and artifacts throughout
Page 19
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Oakland Township received enumeration by archaeologists from Oakland University, with 20OK-33, a burial site, resting about one-half mile southeast of the mill. After the Detroit Treaty of
1807 and United States victory in the War of 1812 settlers, mostly veterans of the war, received
encouragement to relocate to the Northwest Territory. This influx of settlers led to the departure
of many Native Americans. Area topography created two natural entrances into the valley, one
from the north and another from the south. A Native American Trail paralleled Paint Creek
where Orion Road and Territorial Road now run. The valley offered protection from weather and
had a natural travel pattern. This setting gave settlers a sense of security, with observations of
valley visitors easily made. The main attraction of the area remained Paint Creek, allowing for
travel by way of canoe to the Clinton River, which flowed to Lake St. Clair and then on to the
Great Lakes. It provided fresh water, food, good soil, stone, wood, wildlife, and the ability to
generate power. The milling operations were important to the development of the settlement,
and contribute to the agriculture heritage of Goodison.
The Paint Creek Cider Mill, having served as a place to engage in commerce, ideas, and
general information throughout its use as a gristmill, continues as a community venue bringing
residents together. The building is used by the following organizations: Six Rivers Land
Conservancy (office), Paint Creek Trailway (office), Historic District Commission (office),
Stewardship Committee (office), Safety and Trails Committee (office), and Paint Creek Cider
Mill (leased tenant).
Meetings for various township subcommittees use the wheel room for meeting space,
master planning, open houses, Historic District Commission programs, all Parks and Recreation
subcommittees, Paint Creek Trailways, and meetings space for Safety Paths and Trails. There are
many Exhibitions, located in the gallery area, which have included: Oakland Township
Historical Society--“Our History Centers on the Mill;” “Edward Noble” photography; Miniature
Quilt Squares by Historic District Commission; and Six Rivers Conservancy “Nature Near You”
annual photography show, sale, and fundraiser. Festivals have included a native plant sale and
the start/finish/check-point of the Paint Creek Trailway’s twenty-mile summer bike ride called
the Paint Creek Crawl. The mill houses a bicycle repair station for Paint Creek Trail, which
follows the bed of the New York Central Railroad. Seating areas outside of the building find use
by walkers and bikers on the trail and those dining in the current cafe.
As the “Paint Creek Cider Mill,” the Society for the Preservation of Old Mills assigns number
MI-063-009 in its registration listings.
The Paint Creek Cider Mill in Goodison remains today a central gathering place, representing
a classic example of a small community with preserved history.
Page 20
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
______________________________________________________________________________
9. Major Bibliographical References
Bibliography
"Aerial Maps of Oakland Township." Natural Resources Mapping Services.
Accessed: 1 December, 2013. https://gis.oakgov.com/propertygateway/home.mvc.
Davis, Irma N. Modern Day Live Wire Uses Old Time Power. The Birmingham Eccentric. 13
October, 1960.
Deed Transfer Books. Oakland County Office of the Register of Deeds. Pontiac, Michigan.
Dziurman, John. John Dziurman Architects. Research documents for Goodison Historic
District. Historic District Commission files. 2002.
Durant, Samuel, editor. History of Oakland County, Michigan, 1817-1877. Philadelphia. L.H.
Everts. & Co. 1877. Pages 250-251.
Eastern Michigan University. Goodison Survey. Historic Preservation Program Preservation
Research Techniques. Fall 1998.
Federal and patent listings, which included name of purchaser, date and property description of
patented lands. State Archives. Lansing, Michigan.
First Landowners if Oakland County, Michigan. Oakland County Genealogical Society.
Birmingham, Michigan. 1981.
Gear, Cider King: Key Cog in Village Core. The Pontiac Press. 16 June 1969.
Goodison Building Restoration Will Be Dining Hall, Cider Mill. The Rochester Clarion. 7
January, 1960.
Goodison History Centers on Mill. The Pontiac Press. 13 June, 1969.
Hass, Joe. 110 Year Old Mill Will Be Restored. The Pontiac Press. 12 December, 1945.
Ingenuity Harnessed to Fashion Defunct Part. The Oakland Press. 2 August, 1993.
Kaza, Greg. Invisible Goodison is an Enigma. The Oakland Press. 14 May, 1988.
Kelly, Delta and Kandarian, Barbara (eds). Heritage and Oakland Township. Oakland Township
Historical Society. Rochester, Michigan. 1976. State Library. Lansing, Michigan.
Page 21
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Kelly, Delta for Oakland Township Historical Society. Some History of the Goodison Settlement.
October 1979.
Mancour, William (Jerry). Unpublished Personal Interview. 4 April, 2009 and 28 Nov. 2011.
Map of Native American Features in Oakland County, including settlements and earthworks.
State Archives. Lansing, Michigan.
Michigan Historical Marker Application. Submitted by Janine Saputo. Oakland Township
Historic District Commission office files. October 2000.
Miller Sr., Dale O. Miller Family History Memoir. Historic District Commission Office Files,
Paint Creek Mill, 4480 Orion Road, Oakland Township, Michigan.
Miller, Edith Dozell Wagner and Susan Prychodko. Miller Family history. Unpublished Oral
Interview by Colleen Barkham, Janine Saputo, Joann Kelly Bourez, Christina Wolf, Barbara
Barber. 25 October 2011.
Noble, Edward R. The Methodist Church, the Goodison Cider Mill and the Paint Creek Cider
Mill. The Oakland Press. 5 February, 1979.
Oakland Township Historical Society. A Footpath through Goodison History. February 2002.
Oakland Township Historical Society. Goodison – Timeline of the Paint Creek Mill. Oakland
Township Historical Society Archives. August 2011.
Old Barn Reclaimed Wood Company. "Pecky Cypress Lumber." Accessed: 3 December 2011.
http://www.reclaimedwoodco.com/page/detail/pecky-cypress-lumber_92/
Rossetti Associates. Architectural drawings; pastel. Circa 1957-58.
Silfven, Sandra. Paint Creek A Restaurant and A Whole Lot More. The Detroit News. 21 August,
1987.
Stamps, Richard B. and Richard Zurell. A Pilot Survey of Archaeological Resources of Oakland
County, Michigan. Oakland University. 1980.
Page 22
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
___________________________________________________________________________
Previous documentation on file (NPS):
____ preliminary determination of individual listing (36 CFR 67) has been requested
____ previously listed in the National Register
____ previously determined eligible by the National Register
____ designated a National Historic Landmark
____ recorded by Historic American Buildings Survey #__
____ recorded by Historic American Engineering Record # __________
____ recorded by Historic American Landscape Survey # ___________
Primary location of additional data:
____ State Historic Preservation Office
____ Other State agency
____ Federal agency
X___ Local government
___ University
____ Other
Name of repository: _____________________________________
Historic Resources Survey Number (if assigned): ________________
______________________________________________________________________________
10. Geographical Data
Acreage of Property 1.98 acres for mill site and 2.44 acres for flume box and section of
millrace.
Use either the UTM system or latitude/longitude coordinates
Latitude/Longitude Coordinates (decimal degrees)
Datum if other than WGS84:__________
(Enter coordinates to 6 decimal places)
Mill Building
1. Latitude: 42.732562/42.732925
Longitude: 83.162053/83.162754
Sluice Gate
2. Latitude: 42.732991
Longitude: 83.163076
Millrace Trail to Footbridge over Millrace
3. Latitude: 42.732965/42.7324291
Longitude: 83.163134/83.164572
Page 23
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Or
UTM References
Datum (indicated on USGS map):
NAD 1927
or
NAD 1983
1. Zone:
Easting:
Northing:
2. Zone:
Easting:
Northing:
3. Zone:
Easting:
Northing:
4. Zone:
Easting :
Northing:
Verbal Boundary Description:
The Paint Creek Cider Mill property extends northwest to southeast, along the east side
of the Paint Creek bank, on Orion Road at the southern end of Collins Road, to Gallagher Road
on the south side of Orion Road in Goodison. The flume/sluice box and millrace continue west
of Gallagher Road between Paint Creek and Orion Road. Michigan Historic Marker L2105 (Log
Number 1354) marks the location of the flume/sluice box with a “trail” extending northwest
along the millrace. In township records, the parcel appears as PIN 10-28-426-009 for the Paint
Creek Mill and PIN 10-28-251-003 for the flume/sluice and State Historical marker for the Paint
Creek Mill Race.
Legal Description:
T4N, R11E, SEC 28 SUPERVISOR'S PLAT NO 1 LOT 37 EXC BEG AT SW LOT COR, TH
ALG CURVE CONCAVE SWLY, RAD 3129.57 FT, CHORD BEARS N 39-41-27 W 223 FT,
DIST OF 223.05 FT, TH S 67-27-03 E 99.49 FT, TH S 48-47-10 E 169.52 FT, TH S 74-13-10
W 80 FT TO BEG, ALSO THAT PART OF PENN-CENTRAL RAILROAD R/W BEG AT NW
COR OF SD LOT 37, TH S 47-51-30 E 23.61 FT, TH ALG CURVE CONCAVE SWLY, RAD
3154.57 FT, CHORD BEARS S 45-24-23 E 269.92 FT, DIST OF 270 FT, TH N 77-13-20 W
77.90 FT, TH N 42-35-58 W 231.65 FT, TH N 52-38-35 E 29 FT TO BEG 3-22-02 FR 001 &
503-012
Page 24
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Boundary Justification:
Physical features and political designations using area roads delineate these natural site
boundaries.
Flume/sluice box located at 4400 Orion Road - 10-28-251-003 2.44 Acres
T4N, R11E, SEC 28 SUPERVISOR'S PLAT NO 1 LOT 13
_____________________________________________________________________________
11. Form Prepared By: (who to contact for questions)
Name/title:
Barbara Barber, Historic Preservation Planner
Organization: Oakland Township Historic District Commission
Street & number: 4393 Collins Road
City or town: Oakland Township state: MI
zip code: 48306
E-mail: [email protected]
Telephone: 248-608-6807
Date: January 15, 2014 (Resubmit July 16, 2015)
Also contributing to this form in preparation and research over a period of several years:
Oakland Township Historical Society (Tom Asmus, Colleen Barkham, Sue Fox, William
Kroger, Jeanne Phillips, Janine Saputo); Oakland Township Historic District Commission
(Gene Ferrera, David A. Phillips, John Sanderson, Josiane Whitson, Judy Workings);
Oakland Township Historic District Study Committee (Jan Derry, Susan Knudsen, Jean
Kroger, Jean Lyons, Bruce Parkinson); Eastern Michigan University student research of
Goodison Survey 1998 at direction of Dr. Ted Ligibel; Eastern Michigan University student
intern Andrea Rost; John Dziurman Architects, Deborah Remer, Jan Olson, and William
(Jerry) Mancour.
___________________________________________________________________________
Page 25
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Additional Documentation
Submit the following items with the completed form:

Maps: A USGS map or equivalent (7.5 or 15 minute series) indicating the property's
location.

Sketch map for historic districts and properties having large acreage or numerous
resources. Key all photographs to this map.

Additional items:
Attachment 1: Architectural Drawings in pastel medium with connecting bridge addition.
Stamped Rossetti Associates Incorporated. Early 1970s.
Attachment 2: Paint Creek Mill Etching by T. Mancour (daughter of W. Mancour) 1979.
Attachment 3: Site Map with Building Dates
Attachment 4: PCCM Wheel Room Construction Article
Attachment 5: Miller Carbon filament light article
Attachment 6: PCCM Dining Brochure
Attachment 7: PCCM Architectural Drawings from Adaptive Use
Photographs
Submit clear and descriptive photographs. The size of each image must be 1600x1200 pixels
(minimum), 3000x2000 preferred, at 300 ppi (pixels per inch) or larger. Key all photographs
to the sketch map. Each photograph must be numbered and that number must correspond to
the photograph number on the photo log. For simplicity, the name of the photographer,
photo date, etc. may be listed once on the photograph log and doesn’t need to be labeled on
every photograph.
Photo Log
Name of Property:
Paint Creek Cider Mill
City or Vicinity: Charter Township of Oakland (Goodison)
County: Oakland
State: Michigan
Photographer: Various
Date Photographed: Various
Description of Photograph(s) and number, include description of view indicating direction of
camera: 1 of 55 photos with information.
Page 26
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
Photograph Reference:
1. Land Conveyance 1825 from U.S. Government to Needham Hemingway
2. Needham Hemingway photograph
3. Giffels and Rossetti Photo before Bridge Construction. General view looking slightly
southeast. From Giffels and Rossetti Architects Engineers. Photographer unknown.
1960. (***Looks very much like the work of Balthazar Korab)
4. Old 1835 Gristmill with Box Flume. General view looking south. Photographer
unknown. Ca. 1940s.
5. Antique Store Bailiwick Gifts Antiques. Façade facing Orion Road with SW view.
Photographer unknown. Early 1960s.
6. Giffels and Rossetti Professional photo under eave with D. Miller Sr. standing on bridge.
General view looking slightly south, mostly west. From Giffels and Rossetti Architects
Engineers. Photographer unknown. 1960.
7. Fitz Wheel and working discharge pit. View looking due west. Photographer unknown.
Date unknown.
8. Paint Creek Mill showing the Black Locust tree incorporated into the roof of cider mill
building. View looking SE. Photographer unknown. November 1969
9. Paint Creek Mill front façade standing across Orion Road and looking towards SW.
Paint Creek runs on the backside of the building. Photographer unknown. November
1969.
10. Paint Creek Mill with elevator addition by John Dziurman Architects, looking SE. B.
Barber, Nov 2011.
11. Exterior Parking Lot side of Cider Mill building looking due west from mill parking lot.
B. Barber, Nov 2011.
12. Paint Creek Mill NE façade of the Wheel Room facing Orion Road. B. Barber Nov
2011.
13. Waterwheel Detail looking west. B. Barber Nov 2011.
14. Waterwheel and wheel pit. B. Barber Nov 2011.
15. Fitz Water Wheel Company Sign Detail. B. Barber 2011.
16. Grinding Stone from original flour mill. B. Barber 2011.
17. 200 year old Cider Screw Press collection of antiques by D. Miller on display. B. Barber
2011.
18. Sluice Box and Michigan State Historical Site Marker during a site walk. View is
looking due south. B. Barber May 2010.
19. Sluice Box at Gallaher Road showing Armco water control gate. Looking towards the
west. B. Barber May 2010.
20. Uncovering the Turbine Chamber inside of the wheel room. B. Barber, April 2014.
21. Excavation of the Turbine chamber filled with sand. B. Barber, April 2014.
Page 27
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
22. Inside the Turbine Chamber where the tailrace flows into chamber. B. Barber, April
2014.
23. Edison System Bi-Polar Generator D. C. 110 Volt Generator. Located inside the wheel
room. B. Barber, Nov 2011.
24. Generator Filament detail of McCord Force Feed Lubricator. B. Barber, Nov 2011.
25. Fill the Mill, Spin the Wheel Medallion in first floor entrance area near elevators. Design
by J. Keyes. Painted by J. Olsen. Photo by B. Barber, 2013.
26. DUR Painting by Jim Jeffries depicting the stop in Goodison.
27. Interior entrance hallway to Connecting Bridge which is up towards the right. B. Barber,
Sept 2013
28. Looking due west down the interior length of the connecting bridge. B. Barber, Sept
2013.
29. Salvaged Timber detail in first floor near elevator addition. B. Barber, Sept 2013
30. Small Conference (also called Pub) Room to the west of the cider mill. B. Barber, Sept
2013.
31. Cider Mill Restaurant area. B. Barber, Sept 2013.
32. Interior of Cider Mill looking east. B. Barber, Sept 2013.
33. Tin Ceiling inside Cider Mill. B. Barber, Sept 2013.
34. Rear Building Deck overlooking Paint Creek which runs parallel to the deck. Overhead
structure for a pulled vinyl awning. B. Barber, Sept Oct 2013
35. Second Floor Office Space looking into the Historic District Commission Office.
B. Barber, Sept 2013.
36. Parks and Recreation Office Space on second floor looking due west over length of the
bridge. B. Barber, Sept 2013.
37. Rochester Gear Works Advertisement (Dale Miller Company), shown with products and
services manufactured parts for US Army trucks.
38. Dale O. Miller Sr. standing at his factory Rochester Gear Works which he purchased with
the Paint Creek Mill building, and other structures, in 1945. Photographer not known.
Date c. late 1970s.
39. Rochester Gear Works Advertisement (Dale Miller Company), shown with products and
services manufactured parts for US Army trucks.
40. Rochester Gear Works advertisement Precision Gear
41. Rochester Gear Works advertisement 155 MM Howitzer
42. Rochester Gear Works advertisement Heavy Duty Trucks
43. Paint Creek Market, NW of Paint Creek Mill in Goodison. Photographer unknown. Date
unknown.
Page 28
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service / National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
NPS Form 10-900
OMB No. 1024-0018
Paint Creek Cider Mill
Oakland, MI
Name of Property
County and State
44. Cider Making Operations inside the Paint Creek Mill. Photographer unknown. Date
unknown c. late 1970s.
45. Apple Pressing for cider inside the Paint Creek Mill. Photographer unknown. Date
unknown c. late 1970s.
46. Paint Creek Mill crowds ordering cider and donuts with the Mancour girls. Photographer
unknown. Date unknown ca. late 1970s.
47. Crowds gathering outside to purchase cider and donuts. Photographer unknown. Date
unknown c. late 1970s.
48. Dale O. Miller at doorway entrance to Rochester Gear Works. Photographer not known.
Date c. late 1970s.
49. Dale O. Miller sitting at desk working. Photographer not known. Date c. late 1970s.
50. Dale O. Miller at Rochester Gear Works. Photographer not known. Date c. late 1970s.
51. Concept Drawing of restoration of the original Hemingway gristmill by Giffels & Valllet,
and L. Rossetti.
52. 1963 BW Aerial Map Property Gateway,
https://gis.oakgov.com/propertygateway/home.mvc
53. Goodison ca. 1940s. Long view facing north. Photo from Doris Barkham Collection.
54. 1940 BW Aerial Map from Property Gateway,
https://gis.oakgov.com/propertygateway/home.mvc
55. Paint Creek Mill view from Collins Road looking towards the SW. Photographer
J. Saputo. Date March 2011.
Paperwork Reduction Act Statement: This information is being collected for applications to the National Register of Historic
Places to nominate properties for listing or determine eligibility for listing, to list properties, and to amend existing listings. Response
to this request is required to obtain a benefit in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act, as amended (16 U.S.C.460
et seq.).
Estimated Burden Statement: Public reporting burden for this form is estimated to average 100 hours per response including
time for reviewing instructions, gathering and maintaining data, and completing and reviewing the form. Direct comments regarding
this burden estimate or any aspect of this form to the Office of Planning and Performance Management. U.S. Dept. of the Interior,
1849 C. Street, NW, Washington, DC.
Page 29