TEACCH Fidelity Form - UM-CARD

Observer
Initials
___ ___ ___
First Middle Last
Primary Observer
Reliability Observer
Minimal /No
Implementation
Physical Structure
1. Physical environment is clear and manageable for students with
ASD
Areas for classroom activities are all clearly and visually defined
Physical or visual boundaries (furniture, materials, tape on floor)
are used to help clarify activity areas
The physical structure of the classrooms allows the teacher to see
all students
2. Physical environment is free of distracting stimuli
Sources of visual and noise distractions are minimized in student
work areas ( very little wall décor, child is not seated near an open
window where lots of outside noises can be heard)
Classroom materials are well organized (i.e. labeled, in correct
area, put away when not in use)
Extraneous wall décor in the classroom is kept to a minimum (wall
décor should be related to monthly or weekly theme, or reflect
child art)
3. Classroom areas are easy to identify and designed to address skills
across the curriculum
Daily activities consistently occur in designated areas (i.e. teacherled activities, independent activities, group activities, leisure
activities)
Areas are designed to match student age and developmental level
(i.e. snack, play, self-help, work areas in preschool settings)
Materials needed in each area are easily accessible to staff and
students (when appropriate)
Transition area(s) (location for schedule materials) is incorporated
into classroom space if needed
4. Physical structure is designed to match student’s needs, learning
style, and sensory differences
Informal assessment is used to determine how students respond to
physical environment
Information gathered from informal assessments is used to make
necessary changes to the physical environment to address student
needs
5. Elements of physical structure are used in environments across the
classroom day and/or school setting
Visual or physical boundaries are in place in student work areas
and class activity centers.
Visual or physical boundaries are in place in cafeteria, gym, music
room, additional classrooms when needed.
Partial
Implementation
TEACCH Fidelity Measure
Full
Implementation
Comparison of Two Treatment Models for Preschool Children with Autism
Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R324B070219
Forms Developed by Project Staff
Hume, K., Boyd, B., McBee, M., Coman, D., Gutierrez, A. et al. (2011). Assessing implementation of comprehensive treatment models for young
children with ASD: Reliability and validity of two measures. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 1430-1440.
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Date: __ __/__ __/__ __ __ __
Observation Time Period: 1 2 3 4
Method of Collection for “R” items:  In Person  By phone  Both
O
R
TEACCH
Treatment Comparison Study
Minimal /No
Implementation
Partial
Implementation
Visual Schedules
6. Visual schedules and related components are used
consistently throughout the day
Overall classroom schedule prominently displayed that
indicates staff and student assignments
Individual child schedules are used consistently
throughout the day
Visual transition cues are used consistently throughout
the day
Classroom areas are visually labeled with matching
schedule components (i.e. pocket with matching
object, photo, icon)
7. Individual schedules are designed to match student’s
developmental level, strengths, and needs
Assessment is used in determining the appropriate
schedule length, location, and manner of presentation
Students have individual daily schedules adjusted to
their developmental level
8. Students are taught how to use the visual schedule and
how to address changes that occur in the schedule
Students are prepared for changes in scheduled
activities (i.e. visual cue to indicate a new activity)
Staff prompts students with minimal verbal/physical
cues (if needed) when using schedule
9. Visual schedules are used within classroom activities
and/or outside of the classroom throughout daily activities
(i.e. gym, cafeteria, general education settings)
Individual within activity schedules are available to
use during different classroom activities, if needed
(e.g. the child may have a separate activity schedule
that is just used for circle time or one that is only at
snack time)
Individual schedules move with the student across
setting OR elements of visual schedules are located
across setting (i.e. transition cards, schedule cues,
matching pockets)
Comments:
Full
Implementation
Comparison of Two Treatment Models for Preschool Children with Autism
Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R324B070219
Forms Develop by Project Staff
Hume, K., Boyd, B., McBee, M., Coman, D., Gutierrez, A. et al. (2011). Assessing implementation of comprehensive treatment models for young
children with ASD: Reliability and validity of two measures. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 1430-1440
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Minimal /No
Implementation
Partial
Implementation
Work Systems
10. Work systems and related components are used
consistently throughout the day
A work system is in place for each student to use during
independent work time (The organization and structure
of the work system should answer 4 questions for the
student- What work do I do? How much work? When
am I finished? What activity do I do next?)
Work systems are used consistently during independent
work time each day
Students are using work systems independent of teacher
prompting
11. Work systems are designed to match student’s
developmental level, strengths, and needs
Assessment is used in determining the appropriate work
system format and length
Work systems are individualized to match student’s
developmental level (left-to-right, matching, written)
and interests
12. Activities used in independent work systems are
individualized
Tasks used in independent work areas reflect previously
mastered skills and are rotated frequently
Tasks used in independent work areas are related to
individual goals and objectives
13. Work systems are used across the classroom day and
outside of the classroom (beyond independent work time)
(i.e. art activities, hygiene, teaching time, gym, cafeteria,
general education settings)
The 4 questions are answered visually for students when
they arrive at a number of school locations/participate in
a number of school activities
Full
Implementation
Comparison of Two Treatment Models for Preschool Children with Autism
Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R324B070219
Forms Develop by Project Staff
Hume, K., Boyd, B., McBee, M., Coman, D., Gutierrez, A. et al. (2011). Assessing implementation of comprehensive treatment models for young
children with ASD: Reliability and validity of two measures. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 1430-1440
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NOTE:
To score this section the rater should observe a minimum of two children of different functioning levels during
independent teaching time.
Comments:
TEACCH
Treatment Comparison Study
3
TEACCH
Treatment Comparison Study
Minimal /No
Implementation
Partial
Implementation
Visual Structure
14. Tasks and activities are meaningful to students
Visual instructions are provided in work tasks and class
activities
Visual instructions are individualized to match student’s
developmental level (i.e. materials, jigs, pictures, lists)
15. Tasks and activities are visually very clear to students
Elements of visual organization are incorporated in work
tasks and class activities (i.e. materials are contained,
minimal set-up required, few extra parts/pieces)
Tasks are organized in variety of formats (i.e. folders, books,
left-to-right trays, baskets)
Visual clarity is provided in work tasks and class activities
(i.e. use of highlighting, numbers, arrows, color
codes/schemes)
Comments:
Full
Implementation
Comparison of Two Treatment Models for Preschool Children with Autism
Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R324B070219
Forms Develop by Project Staff
Hume, K., Boyd, B., McBee, M., Coman, D., Gutierrez, A. et al. (2011). Assessing implementation of comprehensive treatment models for young
children with ASD: Reliability and validity of two measures. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 1430-1440
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R
Minimal /No
Implementation
Partial
Implementation
Assessment and Teaching Time
16. Teaching goals are designed to match student’s
developmental level, strengths, and needs
Staff uses formal/informal assessment to determine student
emerging skills
Teaching goals and objectives are appropriate to the
developmental level of the child and target emerging skills
17. Teaching activities are designed to match student’s
developmental level, strengths, and needs
Work tasks and class activities are related to identified
goals and objectives
Patterns of strengths and weaknesses, as well as student
interests, are incorporated into work tasks and class
activities
Functional needs/skill areas are incorporated into work
tasks and class activities
18. Teaching time promotes the development of student
independence and generalization of skills
Teaching activities are designed to promote independence
(i.e. emphasis on visual structure, lowest level of prompting
utilized)
A number of tasks are introduced to address the skill area(s)
to ensure multiple opportunities for practice and
generalization
Emphasis on naturally occurring reinforcers/embedded
reinforcement during teaching time
Variety of staff members work with students during
teaching time and address skills across curricular areas
Teaching time occurs in a variety of settings (1:1, small
group, large group)
19. Teaching time is a structured activity that addresses skills
across the curriculum following a logical scope and sequence
Materials are presented systematically and in an organized
fashion
Skills/tasks are broken into steps
Data are consistently recorded on student performance
during assessments and teaching activities
Physical structure, schedules, work systems, and visual
structure are utilized during teaching times
Full
Implementation
Comparison of Two Treatment Models for Preschool Children with Autism
Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R324B070219
Forms Develop by Project Staff
Hume, K., Boyd, B., McBee, M., Coman, D., Gutierrez, A. et al. (2011). Assessing implementation of comprehensive treatment models for young
children with ASD: Reliability and validity of two measures. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 1430-1440
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NOTE:
To score this section the rater should observe a minimum of two children of different functioning levels during one to
one teaching time.
Comments:
TEACCH
Treatment Comparison Study
5
TEACCH
Treatment Comparison Study
Minimal /No
Implementation
Partial
Implementation
Communication
20. Receptive language supports are utilized consistently
Staff’s language is appropriate for child’s level of
understanding
Verbal communication to students is supplemented or
replaced by visual supports
21. Expressive communication systems are designed to
match student’s developmental level, strengths, and needs
Formal/informal assessment is used to determine
student’s communication goals and in the design of
communication systems/activities
Expressive communication systems are individualized
for the level of each student
Expressive communication systems are used
consistently with each student across the school day
22. Language instruction is individualized and focuses on
teaching functional communication skills
Communication instruction emphasizes meaningful,
spontaneous communication
Communication instruction is incorporated into the
daily routine
23. The classroom environment stimulates communication
Communication activities incorporate appropriate
elements of visual structure
Structured environment is used to facilitate
communicative opportunities (i.e. asking for missing
part/piece in structured task)
Comments:
Full
Implementation
Comparison of Two Treatment Models for Preschool Children with Autism
Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R324B070219
Forms Develop by Project Staff
Hume, K., Boyd, B., McBee, M., Coman, D., Gutierrez, A. et al. (2011). Assessing implementation of comprehensive treatment models for young
children with ASD: Reliability and validity of two measures. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 1430-1440
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TEACCH
Treatment Comparison Study
Minimal /No
Implementation
Social and Leisure
24. Activities addressing leisure and social skills are designed 5
to match student’s developmental level, strengths, and needs
Informal assessment is used to determine student’s social
and leisure goals, as well as in the design of social/leisure
activities
Social skills activities are appropriate to student’s
developmental level (i.e. proximity, parallel, turn taking,
rules)
Leisure and social activities are planned around individual
student interests
Leisure and social activities incorporate appropriate
elements of visual structure
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25. Leisure activities are taught to facilitate student’s
independent use of free time
Students are actively engaged in leisure activities during
free time
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26. Social skills training focuses on facilitating positive
experiences with others
Social skills training facilitates interaction with others
Social skills training occurs in a variety of contexts across
the school day (i.e. group activities, paired activities)
Social skills training involves typically developing peers if
appropriate peer models are available
Comments:
Partial
Implementation
Full
Implementation
Comparison of Two Treatment Models for Preschool Children with Autism
Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R324B070219
Forms Develop by Project Staff
Hume, K., Boyd, B., McBee, M., Coman, D., Gutierrez, A. et al. (2011). Assessing implementation of comprehensive treatment models for young
children with ASD: Reliability and validity of two measures. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 1430-1440
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Minimal /No
Implementation
Behavior Management
27. *Behavior management strategies are influenced by an
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understanding of the culture of autism
Behavior challenges are analyzed recognizing the deficits
and developmental level of the student, as well as reframing the problems from the perspective of a person
with autism (iceberg model)
Behavior interventions are designed/implemented around
an understanding of developmental level and the
perspective of a person with autism
28.* Behavior management strategies are primarily proactive 5
Behavior management strategies emphasize positive,
antecedent based approaches and the prevention of
behavior problems
Limits and/or rules are visually clarified/made concrete for
each student
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29. Data are consistently recorded on behavior plans and
summarized/analyzed regularly
A system for collecting data effectively has been
established
Data are monitored daily/weekly by staff
Interventions are modified based on data collected
Partial
Implementation
Full
Implementation
Comparison of Two Treatment Models for Preschool Children with Autism
Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R324B070219
Forms Develop by Project Staff
Hume, K., Boyd, B., McBee, M., Coman, D., Gutierrez, A. et al. (2011). Assessing implementation of comprehensive treatment models for young
children with ASD: Reliability and validity of two measures. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 1430-1440
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NOTE:
Observation of these indicators supersedes report. If these indicators are not observed use indicators to guide an
interview with the teacher to score this section.
*The rater should look for some of the following proactive strategies used by the teacher to score items 27 & 28:
Decreased verbal instructions/demands by the teacher. The teacher should reduce verbal input or
demands on the child when a behavior problem occurs.
Teacher should use visuals (pictures, written words, objects, etc) instead of words to address the child’s
behavior problems.
Teacher should move from an abstract to more concrete hierarchy of visual presentation if the child
continues to show behavior problems. For example, if the teacher is attempting to transition the child to
the work area of the classroom and the child begins to tantrum…The teacher may start with showing the
child a picture of the work area from the schedule, then move to actually taking an object or task from the
work area and showing it to the child to help him/her transition.
The teacher may also use a “first-then” contingency or reward system.
The teacher should use physically moving the child as a last resort.
If the rater is unable to observe a child with autism in the classroom engaged in a behavior problem, then the
teacher should be asked about his/her approach to managing behavior. A potential question to ask is, “How do
you address problem behavior when children are having difficulty transitioning from one area of the classroom to
another?” The teacher should mention some of the above strategies when answering this question.
Comments:
TEACCH
Treatment Comparison Study
8
Minimal /No
Implementation
Partial
Implementation
Family Involvement
30. Collaboration with families is prioritized
Family input is used in the development of student
goals and objectives
A consistent system of communication exists between
school and home (i.e. daily notes, a communication
notebook, a schedule of regular phone calls or home
visits)
31. Families are welcomed in the classroom and/or staff is
welcomed into the home
Opportunities for family members to participate in
their child’s classroom activities are available and
utilized.
Opportunities to train family members in the use of
successful classroom strategies are available (in the
home or classroom)
Full
Implementation
Comparison of Two Treatment Models for Preschool Children with Autism
Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R324B070219
Forms Develop by Project Staff
Hume, K., Boyd, B., McBee, M., Coman, D., Gutierrez, A. et al. (2011). Assessing implementation of comprehensive treatment models for young
children with ASD: Reliability and validity of two measures. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 1430-1440
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NOTE:
Observation of these indicators supersedes report. If these indicators are not observed use indicators to guide an
interview with the teacher to score this section.
Comments:
TEACCH
Treatment Comparison Study
9