EC436 Using your Dress Form

University of Nebraska - Lincoln
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Historical Materials from University of NebraskaLincoln Extension
Extension
10-1-1946
EC436 Using your Dress Form
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"EC436 Using your Dress Form" (1946). Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension. Paper 2159.
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E. C.
October
1946
436
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RFF.KP.ENCE DEPARTMENT
CLEMSOli COLLEuE LIBRARY
Using Your Dress Form
In addition to fitting new garments wh ich you are
making, your dress form should h elp you i n the following
ways :
Ref i tt i ng ready-made s
Remodeling garments
Adjusting collars, belts, pockets, or trimmings
_Marking hems
Lining or relining jackets and coats
Making and fitting slips
Check Size and Shape of Form
It may be helpful to try a good fitting dress on
the form and observe how it fits in comparison with the
way it fits you.
A dress which opens down the front
will be easiest to use.
Attach shoulder pads as usually worn to dress form.
Making the Form More Usable
After your dress form has been shellacked and
mounted it may be made more usable by adding a covering
and marking the fitting lines.
r
I
. I
A knitted shirt, kn i tted fabric, or a muslin waist
snugly fitted may be used as covering.
A drawstring or
two 'r ows of gathering stitches in the lower edge of the
knitted material will help to fit it to the form. Fasten
the covering securely so it will not slip out of place.
Such a covering helps to keep the garment which is being
fitted in place, and also forms a foundation to which a
pattern or garment may be pinned.
Cooperative
Extension
Work
in
Agriculture
and
Home Economics
University of Nebraska College of Agriculture, and the United States
Department. of Agriculture
cooperatin~,
W, H. Brokaw, Director, Lincoln.
Marking the Seam .2.!: Fitting Lines
Use narrow black tape, crayon, or pencil to mark on
the form the lines shown her e .
These guides for taking
measurements may help you in locat i ng and placing the
lines.
NECK - Locate neck line by placing tape around t he base
of the neck where the neck joins the shoulder . Allow
tape to pass just above the l arge bone a t base of
neck and across t he c enter of the p i t at t he f r ont of
neck.
BUST - Pass tape around the figur e over ful l est part of
bust in front and r a ising it to t he tip of shoulder
blades in the back.
The line ac ros s t he back i s
parallel to the fl oor.
HIP - Lo cate the largest part of the hi ps , which is
usually 7 to 10 inches below the waist.
Line should
be par allel to the floor.
ARMHOLE - Place tape over top of arm at the high point
of shoulder. Tape should be parallel to center front
and back as far down as the chest line, then curve
gradually to the underarm.
SHOULDER - This line extends from the highest point of
the shoulder at the base of the neck to the highest
point of the shoulder at armhole.
CENTER FRONT - Place tape directly in front from center
neckline t o hip line, bisecting the figure.
CENTER BACK - Place tape fr om cent er of neck l ine to hip
line, bisecting t he figure.
UNDERARM - Drop a l i ne from the lower part of the armhole to the waist.
This line should appear to be a
continuation of the shoulder line.
CHEST - 6 11 down from shoulder seam at neck line, place a
straight line from armhole to armhole.
WIDTH ACROSS BA.CK AT SHOULDER BLADES - 711 down from
Measure from armhole to
shoulder seam at neckline.
armhole.
AR.M SCY E
Check Your Pattern -on --the ----Dress ---Form
As you prepare to check your pattern on the dress
form, keep in mind that all patterns allow a certain
amount for ease in addition to the seam allowance .
The
amount of fullness needed for ease depends on the kind
of material and style of the dress -- thin, shear
fabrics need more fullness than heavy tailored ones;
soft, dressy styles more than straight, slim styles.
Some muscular figures require a greater allowance of
ease for comfort than do others.
Most patterns allow
the following amount of ease:
411 thr ough the bust -- 211 or
and abou t 2 11 in the back.
About
From
At
t 11
t 11
more across the front
i n t he ches t widt h.
to 1 11 i n back width across shoulder blades.
least ~ 11 i n
all
blouse
length measurements.
About 2 11 at hips for a plain sk i rt -- 1" in front,
1" in back.
Some fullness can be fitted out later
if there is too much.
~~~ to
3/4 11 in sleeve cap length to allow
shoulder pads, if pattern calls for them.
3 11
to 4 11 in
At
least
sleeve
1 11 at
the
width at
elbow
bottom
in a
for
of armhole.
fitted
sleeve.
With these allowances in mind, prepare your pattern
and try on the form in this way:
1.
2.
3·
4.
5·
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Pin in darts, tucks, etc., as indicated on
pattern.
Pin blouse front to form at center front.
back.
Pin blouse back to form at center
Pin in shoulder seam.
Pin i n underarm seam.
Ad just blouse fullness at waistlin e.
Pin ski rt front to cent er front of form and
blou se .
Pi n sk irt back t o cent er back of fo r m and
b louse.
P in skirt s i de seam.
Che ck the f it and make any needed alterations
in the patt ern before cutting out the dress.
A dress form i s rigid and does not allow for body
movements.
For this reason you may have difficulty in
getting a dress over the shoulders, especially if you
have broad shoulders , or if sleeve caps have been built
into the form.
For fitting on a form it is better to
leave the blouse open a t one or both underarm seams. Be
car eful not to fit too snugly on the form or the dress
will be uncomfortable.
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